Here’s How This Program Will Help to Prevent Illegal Fishing

Here’s How This Program Will Help to Prevent Illegal Fishing

31 percent of total fish caught globally, which is worth $34.4 billion annually, is done so illegally.

But, a new program is aiming to drastically decrease this percentage.

On January 1, the Seafood Import Monitoring Program (SIMP) went live to stop the sale of black market fish in the U.S. 

Now fish entering the country must also have specific information about how it was caught .

“SIMP asks basic questions about seafood entering the US: who caught it (vessel flag and registration info), what is it (specific species), when was it caught (dates of operation), where (jurisdiction of fishing location) and how it was caught (what type of gear or method was used,)” writes the “Huffington Post.” 

13 species groups are now subjected to the questioning, including “abalone, Atlantic Cod, blue crab (Atlantic), dolphinfish (mahi mahi), grouper, king crab (red), Pacific cod, red snapper, sea cucumbers, sharks, shrimp, swordfish and tunas (albacore, bigeye, skipjack, yellowfin and bluefin).”

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