Food Tech and Incubators Are All The Rage

Food Tech and Incubators Are All The Rage
  • Food technology is creating a space for more brands and restaurants to become innovative in how they meet consumer demand.

  • Being innovative means being able to understand your consumers’ needs and providing a unique solution.

Food technology has had one of the largest impacts on the foodservice industry since social media.

In this episode, Host Bill Bender unpacks with the panelists what exactly innovation in the foodservice industry means and how it can either improve or hamper the growth of the industry.

Is this a fad or a complete shift in the model of how food innovation will occur in the future? Take a listen for more insights on how technology is innovating how we meet consumers’ needs.


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How Restaurant Incubators Are a Win-Win for Investors and Chefs

How Restaurant Incubators Are a Win-Win for Investors and Chefs

By Jim Berman, Foodable Industry Expert

Raising capital, finding a key location, insuring a business, and tackling marketing are only some of the demands that a new restaurateur must manhandle before even the first crawl into the kitchen. What if there were smart investors who were just unzipped enough to open a door or two for creativity? Or perhaps some cash, a place to sell food? What if business acumen, wrapped with just enough of an absurd bent on fiscal adventure to help a skilled kitchen hooligan, was a good qualification for an investor?

And the incubator was born. Up from the rubble of a deflated technology burst-bubble, the incubator evolved as a safe haven for the creatively inclined to nurture their idea using the resources — like money — of an investor without being strapped to a bank. Rather, the incubator offers guidance to usher new projects to market.

In the same vein, a restaurant incubator provides the physical space, along with other supports, to cultivate the growth of a spirited chef as they open their own place. Dotted throughout the country, like Chicago’s Intro and R. House in Baltimore, these incubators offer an opportunity for chefs that may otherwise be locked out of owning their own businesses. Brooklyn FoodWorks, for example, was created to cultivate creativity with a distinctly Brooklyn flavor. The New York iteration of the incubator employs a panel of industry experts and advisors to move the talent beyond the kitchen door.

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Trinity Groves Boasts Incubator for Young Concepts with X-Factor

Foodable WebTV Network

Foodable WebTV Network

If you’re looking for the hot, new place to dine in Dallas, look no further than Trinity Groves. It’s actually not a singular place, but a whole span of up-and-comers — incubators, if you will. Spanning from seafood to Asian-Latin fusion, the concepts being invested in are young and offer something unique — at least, that’s what investors are looking for in the near dozen concepts being tested out in the lineup of restaurants that have been reconstructed from a former truck terminal. 

One investor, Phil Romano of Romano’s Macaroni Grill, is looking for that X-factor — “…What’s going to make me go and eat their food rather than somebody else’s food? Does it taste better? Does it look better? What is it?,” he told the Seattle Pi.

With social media fan interaction and a bit more flexibility in today’s landscape, one of the restaurants offers a permanent pop-up that changes out each quarter, with the public ultimately deciding who will get next dibs. Read More