Local Restaurants Battle Never-Ending LA Heatwave to Feature Innovative Fall Flavors

Local Restaurants Battle Never-Ending LA Heatwave to Feature Innovative Fall Flavors

By Courtney Walsh, West Coast Editor

At a time in the year where diners are ready to cozy up to a hot bowl of pumpkin bisque, Los Angeles has been having one of the longest lived heat waves in recent years. With temperatures still ranging in the high 80’s in many parts of LA, serving up cold weather comfort food has thus been a challenge for many local purveyors. However, not everyone has been stifled by the heat and several innovative local restaurants have found ways to still incorporate the fall flavors diners crave that can still be enjoyed in summer temperatures.

Doma Kitchen

At Manhattan Beach favorite Doma Kitchen, the international cuisine served up by Chef Kristina Miksyte features fresh, seasonal ingredients and local, farm to table produce. To celebrate the beginning of the autumn season, Doma Kitchen has introduced a number of fall themed dishes that still maintain a light, fresh quality that can be enjoyed regardless of weather conditions.

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Forage Brings Local, Seasonal Fare to Trendy Silverlake

Forage Brings Local, Seasonal Fare to Trendy Silverlake

By Justin Dolezal, Foodable Contributor

Silverlake, long an artistic and cultural hub in creative Los Angeles, has often lagged behind other neighborhoods in terms of quality dining options. It's not as if the neighborhood isn't fit for great dining; after all, this is a neighborhood that prides itself on contemporary relevance across the board. At the young end of the spectrum, Silverlake is a hip, trend-focused neighborhood, where indie bands and contemporary fashion dominate the scene. Mature Silverlake is composed of young families with expendable incomes, who frequent the neighborhood's farmers' markets and advocate for architectural preservation at community board meetings. It's certainly fertile ground, which has made the lack of exciting restaurants perplexing.

The tide may be turning, however, as a new slew of exciting food spots have opened recently, giving Silverlake's young, hip population more than a few fantastic places to eat. One of the more exciting spots to open in recent years has been Forage, a fast-casual eatery that feels particularly well suited to Silverlake's neighborhood personality. Located on the eastern stretch of Sunset Blvd that constitutes the the neighborhood's main thoroughfare, Forage focuses on preparing a rotating daily selection of seasonally inspired dishes, made with ingredients sourced from local farms and urban gardens. The idea of supporting local farms and businesses through sustainably sourced, seasonal cuisine is hardly revolutionary; these concepts have been buzz terms in contemporary dining for some time. But Forage has succeeded by utilizing the popularity of the Locavore movement to attract millennial diners to what is, first and foremost, a fantastic place to get food, presenting cuisine that reflects the local community in a way that feels at the same time of the moment and timelessly welcoming.

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Quality Food and Quality Music Go Hand in Hand at LA's FYF Festival

Quality Food and Quality Music Go Hand in Hand at LA's FYF Festival

By Justin Dolezal, Foodable Contributor

Summer music festivals are known for a variety of things: hot new bands, reunited supergroups, huge crowds, and regret at having not packed sunscreen. The concept of music festival food, however, likely brings to mind feelings of underwhelmed resignation, memories of paying seven dollars for gross pizza or splurging on flavorless pad thai. You're unsurprised if it's mediocre, you're delighted if it's average.

Luckily, the tide may be turning. As the culinary attitudes of the millennials who attend these events in droves evolve and advance, festival organizers have been forced to adapt. Heat-lamp grub and overpriced macro-beers don't cut it for the discerning young music fan, especially as the price of admission for these festivals continues to rise. This scenario provides both a challenge and an opportunity. Forced to up the festival food game, organizers have increasingly looked to their local fast-casual dining community, favoring vendors whose dishes reflect local food trends and inspire a sense of community and locavorism. The result is a festival like Los Angeles's recent FYF Festival, which showcased the city's diverse food and beverage scene and provided a model that festivals nationwide would be wise to follow.

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“Why Whole Grain is Important” and Other Lessons from the Los Angeles Bread Festival

“Why Whole Grain is Important” and Other Lessons from the Los Angeles Bread Festival

By Courtney WalshWest Coast Editor

Following close on the heels of the farm-to-table movement, in which chefs and diners alike have begun taking a much more involved approach in both ingredient sourcing and food preparation, Los Angeles has recently been witness to the emergence of a similar movement within the city’s top restaurants and bakeries - craft bread. 

This emerging craft bread movement sees the same focus on artisanal and handcrafted ingredients extend into the baking arena as well as a focus on working with local growers and farms that work with heritage wheat.

Earlier this month, at the first Los Angeles Bread Festival, a number of the city’s finest small lot bakers, grain growers and stone millers gathered to discuss the trends they’ve witnessed in LA’s burgeoning craft bread movement as well as some of the challenges they’ve faced in getting the bread scene to where it is now.

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Chicago's "Eat What You Grow" Program Teaches the Importance of Local Food to Young Students

Chicago public schools are starting young when it comes to teaching students the benefits — and safety measures — in growing their own food. The city’s “Eat What You Grow” program includes five schools, including those at the elementary level. From basics like sweet peppers to unique fare like okra and kohlrabi, harvesting their own crops allows students to learn about different ingredients while reaping the benefits of eating freshly and transparently.

Imagine if all cities adopted programs like this? In an age where local food is in the foreground — and we don’t see that stopping — these are the steps we need to be taking for future generations. Read More