Scratch Cooking Revives Traditional Views of Casual Dining

Scratch Cooking Revives Traditional Views of Casual Dining

On this episode of The Barron Report, brought to you by Kabbage, the Tupelo Honey team joins Paul Barron in a discussion of what makes brands successful in today's market.

Tupelo Honey was founded in Asheville in 2001 as a revival of Southern food and traditions rooted in the Carolina Mountains. With 15 total locations in 7 states, Tupelo's Southern spirit is infused into every bite of their flavor driven dishes.

CEO Steve Frabitore bought the restaurant in 2008 and it's been growing ever since.

On this episode, VP of Operations and Beverage Director Tyler Alford; and VP of Culinary and Corporate Executive Chef Eric Gabrynowicz take us through the nitty gritty of what has made Tupelo one of Foodable's Top Emerging Brands. 

Tupelo takes great pride in their sourcing. They believe that as a small conglomerate of restaurants, their ability to affect change is far greater than that of smaller, independents. Switching to an organic, locally-grown chicken in their restaurants accounts not for hundreds of dollars in change but hundreds of thousands of dollars.  

And their commitment to top quality culinary doesn't stop there. The beverage program at Tupelo Honey also speaks to the brand's commitment to improving the quality of casual dining chains. With kitchens that cook almost entirely from scratch, Chef Gabrynowics says transforming the beverage program to be more culinary-driven was not a far stretch to make. 

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Farming Industry Impacting Boston’s Summer Tables

Farming Industry Impacting Boston’s Summer Tables

Concerts on the Charles River Esplanade, strolling around Faneuil Hall, browsing farmers markets…these are just a few things that might come to mind when you think summer in Boston. Boston’s strong farming industry impacts the food system, shaping regional summer food trends.

More than ever, the dishes being served in Boston restaurants are designed around the farm, indicative of the area’s thriving culinary scene and the ever-expanding impact chefs and buyers are having on the food system.

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Is Local Pork Worth the Price Tag?

Is Local Pork Worth the Price Tag?

By Brian Murphy, Foodable Contributor

Ask a carnivorous chef what their favorite protein is, and the answer is often “pork.” Flavor aside, the richness and versatility of pork has spawned cult-like followings for chefs and porky menu items, as well as a huge merchandise market. 

Advertisements discuss the latest and outrageous pork items while news reports on bacon trends at fairs, restaurants, and festivals. The North American Meat Institute confirms the scale of the pork business with numbers showing that in 2013, American meat companies produced 23.2 billion pounds of pork. 

Even taking the fact that a few billion pounds of the pork produced is exported, the number of pounds produced is impressive with a U.S. population of 318+ million. A number that has restaurant guests wondering, and chefs taking note: About 97 percent of the pork produced comes from large factory farms. Many chefs revel in the flavor of pork coming from the other 3 percent of the farms, and find fat content, flavor, and quality to be superior. 

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Get to Know Some of the Vendors at the Year-Round Boston Public Market

With an official opening in Summer 2015, Boston Public Market marks the first year-round farmers market for the northeastern city. And just like your typical farmers market, this one comes stocked with all local goods and products, pulled from 38 vendors, including Boston Honey Company, Appleton Farms, Noodle Lab, Hopsters Alley, and a lot more.

In this “On Foodable Side Dish” episode, brought to you by the Foodable Network, Boston Video Correspondent Jacqueline Church takes us into the Market, where she is joined by Tiffany Emig, market manager at Boston Public Market Association. Here, we explore what a few of the local vendors are serving up and get a deeper look at the operations.

How Chefs in Detroit Are Addressing Winter Sourcing Challenges

How Chefs in Detroit Are Addressing Winter Sourcing Challenges

By Dorothy Hernandez, Foodable Contributor

A strawberry grown out of state in December versus a strawberry grown locally in June. It’s no question which fruit is superior in terms of taste. So what do you do during the winter when you’re a Michigan chef who focuses on seasonal cooking and local sourcing?

“Everyone asks me that question,” says Chef James Rigato, known for his contemporary American cooking with a Michigan focus at The Root in White Lake, Mich., and now his ever evolving menus at the recently opened Mabel Gray in suburban Detroit. “What you’re really talking about [is] field growing, that’s what you lose [in the winter] — the wild foraging, you lose field growing, but there’s still a lot of food production going on.”

In recent years, more artisanal food producers have cropped up, and these products have excited chefs like Colin Brown, the executive chef at the Royal Park Hotel in Rochester, Mich. The hotel recently opened Park 600 Bar and Kitchen, which features locally sourced products and craft cocktails; it replaced the upscale hotel’s fine dining restaurant.

“I’ve seen a big change in the last 10, 12 years with new products coming on,” says Brown. “Artisan producers are really coming to the forefront with great products in Michigan.” 

Some of these products and producers include maple syrup, local bakers, and cheese makers.

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