How to Be an Effective Leader in an Evolving Industry

How to Be an Effective Leader in an Evolving Industry
  • The Barron Report's Paul Barron talks to business and management guru Rudy Miick about how to be an effective leader.

  • Our industry's culture has changed and behavior that was acceptable 20 years ago is no longer acceptable.

 

Show Notes

On this episode of The Barron Report, we get to talk leadership with business and management coach, Rudy Miick! Great leadership is a building block in all businesses, but especially in an “industry of pennies” like the restaurant industry. Listen in to hear Paul and Rudy discuss the issues restaurants are facing today and how a great leader can guide their team to success.

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  • 2:26 - Rudy’s blogs
  • 3:36 - Begins Asking “Who Are We?”
  • 6:37  - Creating a Strong Culture Using Employees
  • 12:23 - Defining and Re-assessing Excellence
  • 17:09 - Exposing the Sexual Harassment Problem
  • 22:12 - Certain Behaviors are Not Acceptable Anymore
  • 24:07 - Leaders Must be Attentive to Changes in our Industry
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Forget Multitasking— Here's the No. 1 Trait Any Restaurant Manager Needs to Succeed

Forget Multitasking— Here's the No. 1 Trait Any Restaurant Manager Needs to Succeed

When it comes to managing restaurants, there are many things that are thrown at you. It’s a delicate balancing act where you have to decide what’s important, what can wait until tomorrow and making sure that the restaurant is performing.

Everyone is going to want more of your time. The owner or operator of the restaurant is going to want you to cut expenses, grow the bottom line and make sure that every customer comes back time and time again.

The employees are going to want you to be the leader, to lead by example and be the problem-solver. They will also want you to accept their every scheduling conflict in hopes that life works that way.

The customers are going to want you to check-in on them, provide exceptional service— even when chaos ensues. They expect you to be a beacon of normality in a world that seems to be getting worse year after year.

But there’s a trait that most people forget to take into consideration or discuss when it comes to looking for a restaurant manager.

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How to Spot a Toxic Culture

How to Spot a Toxic Culture

Your restaurant's culture is the life force of your brand. It creates energy. That energy transcends and influences your staff. That trickles down to encompass the guest experience. To those on the outside looking in, it can be either a beacon or a warning sign.

A toxic culture is a symptom of a much deeper condition: the total absence of leadership. The good news is that toxic cultures can be spotted and treated. Determining how aggressive you need to be with the treatment will depend on how bad the toxicity has spread into your brand. Like cancer, toxic cultures have one mission and that is to destroy your brand one person at a time. Just like in the fight against cancer, early detection is your best chance. So, how do you spot a toxic culture? Do you have one? Check out these warning signs and see for yourself.

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4 Ways to Better Mentor Your Culinary Crew

4 Ways to Better Mentor Your Culinary Crew

By Adam M Lamb, Foodable Industry Expert

Once, after having personally cooked a staff meal for the prep crew, I stood off to the side with my sous chef, beaming like a proud poppa as they tore into the food. My sous chef, sensing my smugness, elbowed me into the present by saying, “Don’t think for a moment that just because you cooked them a meal that any one of them wouldn’t gut you like a fish in your sleep.”

Shocked at his assertion, I asked him what he meant. “Telling people what to do isn’t the same thing as leading them,” he replied.

I walked away, dazed and confused. I considered how I came up and the way my chefs had treated me — hazing, denigration, and humiliation were all tactics employed by those that were my de facto role models. If it was good for the goose, wasn’t it also good for the gander?

Had I, up to that point in my career, only been an empty, starched white jacket pushing people around with the authority afforded my position?

Such began my 20-year investigation into culinary leadership best practices.

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How to Become a 4-Dimensional Leader

How to Become a 4-Dimensional Leader

By Donald Burns, Foodable Industry Expert

Things move rather quickly in the restaurant industry. One minute you're the assistant, then your supervisor gets terminated, and congratulations, you are now the boss. The sad thing is, most are not prepared properly for this rapid advancement.

Let’s face it, most of your time is spent keeping your head above water, just maintaining day-to-day operations. Who has the extra time to learn how to become a leader? So most will struggle with the responsibilities of their new position. A few will succeed out of the frustration and anxiety that often accompanies being promoted quickly when they tell themselves,“There has to be an easier way.”

The transition from being a manager to becoming a leader can be broken down into four dimensions. Learning these can help you move into a leadership role much faster than that old-fashioned trial-and-error method.

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