How Supermarket Foodservice Can Compete with Restaurants

How Supermarket Foodservice Can Compete with Restaurants
  • If supermarkets follow these tips they can position their business to better compete with restaurants in the fast casual segment.

  • Grocery retailers can have the real upper hand with time-saving shoppers if they amped their foodservice capabilities.

Grocery stores are uniquely positioned to compete with restaurants when it comes to serving up fresh meals.

Sure. Consumers have more choices today than they did a decade ago with the rise of restaurant openings (especially in the fast-casual segment), but supermarkets can be a one-stop-shop for time-saving shoppers.

It’s true… more and more restaurants are offering healthier options, but if grocery stores can perfect their foodservice game, they will have the real upper hand.

As Supermarket News reports, there are nine things these businesses can do to streamline their operations. Here are four that stood out to us:

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5 Tips on Engineering the Right Menu for Your Restaurant

5 Tips on Engineering the Right Menu for Your Restaurant

By Jim Berman, Foodable Industry Expert

The restaurant menu is the singular most important element of any operation. Yet, it is often relegated to a half-hearted (or misguided) effort at best, and a comical jab at juggling food cost at worst. Where is the logic? Food is the product of any restaurant. So why give such little thought to the device that describes, sells, and advertises your product?

I was just working with a friend getting ready to open his restaurant. Six months of renovating an existing property, he worked nothing short of a miracle being victorious at navigating the license and permits minefield. Amazing at creating a dazzling dining room and even designing an alluring logo for the restaurant signage at the entry, the forthcoming soft opening is but a few days away. I asked about the menu. His response? “Well, we’ll print something in house or send something to the printer.”

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7 Menu Engineering Tips for Restaurant Owners

7 Menu Engineering Tips for Restaurant Owners

By Allison Tetreault, Foodable Industry Expert

Contrary to popular belief, menu costing is not menu engineering. However, it is the first step to getting the granular data you need to start a menu engineering analysis, and downright necessary for calculating food cost percentage and contribution margin, arguably two of the most important restaurant metrics… well, ever.

If you want to learn how to cost a menu, you’ll need to determine your food cost for each menu item:

cost of each ingredient + cost of purchasing = item food cost 

Cost of purchasing not only includes the price you paid for the item, but any delivery fees, interest, return charges, or other expenses related to purchasing inventory (excluding labor costs).

Here’s an example: If an onion costs $0.25 + $1 for delivery ($1.25) and each onion yields eight slices, the onion cost for a dish that includes two slices would be $0.30. If you’re making tomato soup, your menu item food cost might be one stick of butter ($1) + 2 slices white onion ($0.30) + 3 tomatoes ($2) = $3.30.

The more specific you can be about your item food cost, the better you’ll be prepared for the next two metrics.

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