U.S. Govt. Hits China Seafood With 10% Tariffs

U.S. Govt. Hits China Seafood With 10% Tariffs

Earlier this week, the Office of the United States Trade Representative released a list of $200 billion worth of goods from China that will now be subjected to a new 10 percent tax. 

Although the long list features consumer goods like apparel and handbags, nine pages of the list are dedicated to a variety of seafood, including trout, halibut, salmon, tuna, caviar, and much more.

Prior to this recent decision by the U.S. government, China put a 25 percent tax on U.S. seafood in last August.

This has had an impact on American lobster imports, in particular. In 2016, China imported $142.4 million from the American lobster industry. 

"Anything that affects the supply chain is obviously not a great thing," said Kristan Porter, president of the Maine Lobstermen's Association. "The lobstermen obviously are concerned with trade and where they go."

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20% of Consumers Want to Eat More Seafood 

20% of Consumers Want to Eat More Seafood 

Consumers have not only become more educated but also more adventurous. 

With that in mind, you may have noticed more grocery stores and restaurants forgoing at-risk seafood to sell more lesser-known fish.

Whole Foods, for example, started selling lionfish last year. These fish alternatives are also more sustainable. 

According to a recent report from Nielsen, consumers want to know where their fish is being sourced and this is changing how grocery stores are purveying seafood.

"Nielsen noted consumers have concerns about freshness, and found customers are paying attention to where their fish comes from. Sales of all seafood that claimed sustainability were up 3%, compared with a 27% jump in sales of seafood with Marine Stewardship Council labeling and a 30% spike for those with Sustainable Fishing labeling, so grocers want to carefully select seafood purveyors," writes Fooddive.

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