Denver Chef Infuses Classic Seared Alaska Halibut with Thai Flavors

Throughout the world, people rely on the ocean for sustenance and survival. Sustainability practices in harvesting are essential for ensuring the future quality and continuity of seafood. And rapidly evolving technology possibilities are making sustainability a much simpler and more attainable goal.

For its second season, Foodable’s Smart Kitchen & Bar has partnered with the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute to feature chefs who are passionate about sustainable seafood sourcing practices. These chefs share why they love seafood, explain how they select responsible seafood purveyors, and showcase innovative, fish-focused recipes.

This season is also available to stream on Amazon Prime Video and Foodable On-Demand.

The largest type of flatfish, Alaska Halibut is equal parts simple and elegant with a unique, flaky texture and a mild, sweet flavor. Alaska is the largest provider of domestic halibut in the United States, and all wild Alaska fisheries harvest responsibly and sustainably.

In the clip above, Chef Jennifer Jasinski shares her Thai-infused mango Alaska dungeness crab salad and seared Alaska halibut recipe with host Paul Barron. Jasinski's unique recipe pairs halibut and dungeness crab with coconut crusted risotto. As you can see in the video, the dungeness crab that was used is classified as "ugly crab," which simply means it has a less attractive shell (barnacles, discoloration, war wounds), but it is just as safe and delicious to eat as a crab with an attractive-looking shell.

Originally from Santa Barbara, California, Chef Jasinski has always loved the ocean and the diversity of fish it offers. After traveling for over a decade with Wolfgang Puck Food Company, she put down roots in Denver and currently owns five acclaimed restaurants in the city under the group name Crafted Concepts. One of her latest restaurants, Stoic & Genuine, opened in 2014 and features fresh-from-the-water seafood.

Check out the full episode on Amazon Prime Video or Foodable On-Demand to learn more about sustainable seafood practices and Jasinski’s philosophy on leaving no scraps behind.

Sous Vide Alaska Pollock Cooked to Perfection

Originally kept to the domain of professional chefs, sous vide is becoming an increasingly popular cooking method in the average American home. The sous vide cooking method typically consists of vacuum-sealing your choice of food in a bag, cooking it in a bath of water in a glass container, and potentially broiling or searing the food further for a crispier flavor.

For the second season of Smart Kitchen & Bar, Foodable has partnered with the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute to spotlight chefs who actively practice sustainable seafood sourcing. These chefs share why they love seafood, explain how they select responsible seafood vendors, and showcase cutting-edge, fish-focused recipes.

This season is also available to stream on Amazon Prime Video and Foodable On Demand.

Wild Alaska pollock makes for a versatile, flaky, and delicious dish. Alaska pollock is the largest sustainable fishery in the world and is caught in its natural habitat and processed at-sea or on shore. It has a mild cod-like taste and delicate texture prized by chefs from around the world.

In the clip above, Chef Jennifer Booker shares her sous vide Alaska pollock recipe with host Paul Barron. The delicious recipe features a variety of flavorful ingredients including saffron rice, sautéed spinach, garlic, and tomato.

Booker is a personal chef, cookbook author, culinary educator, and business owner based in Atlanta. She also currently serves as an Executive Chef for the Georgia Department of Agriculture. Her culinary company, Your Resident Gourmet, provides in-house cooking, catering, party planning, menu development, and cooking classes. Booker loves seafood, and encourages her clients to rethink the unhealthy stereotypes of southern cuisine.

Check out the full episode on Amazon Prime Video or Foodable On Demand to learn more about southern agriculture and finding fresh, healthy, sustainable seafood.

Canada’s First QSR to Launch Veggie Burger Experiences Beyond Meat Shortages From High Demand

Canada’s First QSR to Launch Veggie Burger Experiences Beyond Meat Shortages From High Demand

Beyond Meat’s largest restaurant partner, A&W Food Services of Canada Inc. has experienced product shortages due to “extreme popularity” of its latest Beyond Burger offering which launched July 9.

According to Plant Based News, some vegan burger patty fans have been “unable to get their hands on it, leading numerous A&W outlets to post signs, with one saying: We are out of Beyond Burgers! Due to a Canada-wide shortage and the extreme popularity of the Beyond Burger, we have run out. Many stores may still carry them. We will continue serving them as soon as we can get more!! Thank you for making our new burger a success!!!”

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Starbucks and Seattle Declare War on Straws: Is It Enough?

Starbucks and Seattle Declare War on Straws: Is It Enough?

Starbucks and the city of Seattle have been getting a lot of attention in the last few days. Sunday, Seattle’s ban on plastic straws, utensils, and cocktail picks went into effect, affecting 5,000 restaurants in the city, according to CBS News.

And Starbucks announced Monday their commitment to removing plastic straws from all 28,000 locations by 2020. Instead they will offer either a recyclable plastic lid or an “alternative material straw,” expected to be made of paper says the New York Times.

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FDA to Meet Over Fiery Cultured Meat Labeling Debate

FDA to Meet Over Fiery Cultured Meat Labeling Debate

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration will host a public meeting July 12th to discuss cultured meat as the debate over labeling the new technology intensifies.

According to New Food Magazine, back in February the U.S Cattlemen’s Association submitted a petition to the U.S. Department of Agriculture requesting they ban labeling cultured meat as “meat.” The USCA’s petition argues that the USDA must establish labeling requirements to differentiate beef products derived from cattle from those created in a laboratory.


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