Check Out These Chef Recipes Using Frozen Fresh Alaska Halibut

Check Out These Chef Recipes Using Frozen Fresh Alaska Halibut
  • These chef recipes will bring flair to your menu. 

  • Halibut is sweat, flakey, and easy to prepare. 

Today in the Foodable Smart Kitchen and Bar Studio we take a look at Frozen Fresh Alaska Halibut. Halibut is a naturally lean whitefish with a sweat, flaky, snow-white meat that is easy to prepare and beautiful on the plate. We asked Chef Thomas Stewart, executive chef of Gianni's Restaurant in The Villa Casa Casuarina, formerly known as the Versace Mansion, to demonstrate how to properly fletch a full Alaska Halibut and to create two recipes using Mediterranean and Italian influences that are present in his renowned Cuisine. 

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Motor City Seafood Contributes to Detroit's Culinary Renaissance

Motor City Seafood Contributes to Detroit's Culinary Renaissance

Detroit has been through a lot, but it is gracefully coming back as a world-class city.

One way to confirm this is through the city’s growing culinary offerings. For example, high-quality seafood.

Although, chefs “get most of the glory when it comes to dining… a chef is only as good as their vendors,” as pointed out by “Detroit Metro Times” reporter Tom Perkins.

Perkins was referring to Matthew Wiseman, in particular, co-owner of Motor City Seafood.

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Foodable Labs Ranks Sustainable Luke's Lobster as a Top 150 Emerging Brand

Foodable Labs Ranks Sustainable Luke's Lobster as a Top 150 Emerging Brand
  • Maine-inspired Luke's Lobster is growing sustainable seafood in fast casual.

  • Foodable Labs ranks NYC-based Luke's Lobster as a Top 150 Emerging Brand. 

 

Turns out, many people were looking for the fresh seafood taste just like Luke and were willing to pay more than they would at the average fast casual for the high-quality dish. Knowing the industry, Luke and Ben were able to ship in fresh from Maine seafood all while maintaining the level of sustainability they feel the product demands. Watch this episode of Foodable's Emerging Brand Series to see how the brand is growing and where they plan to go next. 

Luke's Lobster began in 2009 when Luke Holden, a self-defined Lobsterman from Maine noticed a gap in the dining scene of New York City. Working in the city as an investment banker, Luke longed for the Lobster rolls he'd grown accustomed to back home. But the only lobster he could find was at fine dining establishments and had a 30 dollar price tag. After joining forces with former food writer Ben Conniff, the duo took on the fast-casual seafood scene... and dominated. 

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How Seattle Restaurateur Tom Douglas Is Making Sustainable Seafood More Affordable for Diners

Seattle Rockstar Tom Douglass shows off his knife skills with Alaska Seafood.

Chef Tom Douglas is helping to evolve the sustainability movement in foodservice — at least in Seattle, where he owns more than 10 full-service restaurants.

His 13th, The Carlile Room, pays homage to the ’60s and ’70s. It’s hip, unique and, especially in a culinarily sustainable sense, much needed.

“Sustainability utilization is all part of the lexicon of today’s restaurants,” says Chef Tom.

The Carlile Room menu utilizes high-quality meats and Alaska Seafood to enhance its plant-based dishes.

“In Seattle, you don’t just say ‘I have salmon on the menu,’” he says. “You have to say what species of salmon, where it was caught, how it was caught, if it’s sustainable, and you have to have that conversation with every guest through your menu and through your intelligent waitstaff, and then the chef has to buy [the seafood] properly.”

King Crab at The Carlile Room  | Foodable WebTV Network

King Crab at The Carlile Room | Foodable WebTV Network

The Carlile Room's menu features Alaska Seafood, which compliments its plant-forward dishes  | Instagram @seanpaulcurran

The Carlile Room's menu features Alaska Seafood, which compliments its plant-forward dishes | Instagram @seanpaulcurran

Wok-seared King Crab atop a cucumber salad with black bean sauce  | Foodable WebTV Network

Wok-seared King Crab atop a cucumber salad with black bean sauce | Foodable WebTV Network

Alaska Seafood at Seattle's Public Market  | Foodable WebTV Network

Alaska Seafood at Seattle's Public Market | Foodable WebTV Network

In this episode of “Table 42,” brought to you by Alaska Seafood, host Paul Barron joins Chef Tom in the kitchen to explore some of the underused approaches to different types of Alaska seafood that him and his team are implementing at The Carlile Room. Halibut cheeks and wok-fried King Crab steal the show.

To make high-quality ingredients affordable on the menu, he doesn’t skimp on usage.

“As chefs, we really try to use every part of the fish because it’s really, at this point in the world, the only affordable way to use [it] — whether it’s a whole cow or a whole salmon,” says Chef Tom.

Not only is “nose-to-tail” more beneficial to cost, but also shows respect to our natural resources and to the fish, says the chef. “And it’s also an exciting way for the customer to actually dine with us — to try things they’ve never tried before.” For example, The Carlile Room’s King Crab dish, featured in the episode above, costs the diner only $25. To compare, King Crab at restaurants can sometimes go for $75 a pound.

Watch the full episode as we explore the best in seafood, and to learn how Chef Tom has evolved as a sustainable-focused chef over the years.

Sourcing Sustainable Seafood in Las Vegas

Sourcing Sustainable Seafood in Las Vegas

By Lila Asnani, Foodable Contributor

According to the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority, Las Vegas welcomed a record of 41.1 million visitors in 2014. Las Vegas is ranked as the 4th most visited city in the US for 2015 according to Trip Advisor. Traveler’s Digest ranked Las Vegas as the 6th most popular city for foreign tourists in 2013.

Las Vegas is repeatedly touted as an oasis in the desert by travel publications. Unlike most oases though, Las Vegas does not have an abundance of water nearby so has to import almost all its food. Nowhere is this more evident than in the import of seafood to this city, which is undoubtedly a popular food destination.

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