Bubbling up: Fermented Foods on the Menu and in the Grocery Aisle

Bubbling up: Fermented Foods on the Menu and in the Grocery Aisle

By Rick Zambrano, Foodable Industry Expert

Fermented foods are becoming a more appealing option to diners, as they become more exposed to them in restaurants and food retailers are also leveraging the trend. Experts are touting the benefits of eating fermented foods that have gone through lactic-acid fermentation because of their potential probiotic benefits. These types of foods include yogurt, drinkable yogurts, like kefir and skyr, naturally-fermented pickled vegetable and fruit, particularly kimchi, miso, and tempeh. Kimchi has seen a dramatic rise in its popularity and profile to the everyday consumer. Celebrity Korean-American chefs, including Roy Choi (Kogi BBQ Food Truck), David Chang (Momofuku), and Hooni Kim (Danji in Hell’s Kitchen), have pushed Korean cuisine forward. As an integral element of Korean cuisine, Kimchi has nearly 200 hundred varieties and has clearly benefited from this trend. 

Fermented foods find new popularity

Kimchi’s evolution has taken it from the tables of the independent Korean restaurant to casual and upscale Pan-Asian and American concepts, like Revel in Seattle, as well as national chains like Boston-based Legal Sea Foods. Revel features a Pork Belly Pancake, served with kimchi and bean sprout. At Legal Sea Foods, diners can enjoy the Beef Lettuce Wrap, served with kimchi and scallion ginger sauce. Kimchi is a revered topping for the Japanese fusion taco found in many Korean food trucks like Korilla BBQ in New York, which offers four types of kimchi, and has even become a pizza topping.

Read More

Food Trends Millennials are Talking About: The Rise of Umami

Food Trends Millennials are Talking About: The Rise of Umami

By Carlynn Woolsey, Foodable Contributor

When it comes to tasting our food, it can be pretty easy to distinguish between the four main sensations — salty, sweet, sour, and bitter — but what about umami, the fifth sensation that, as of late, is taking the culinary world by storm?  Umami is derived from the Japanese word for “delicious/tasty” (umami) and literally translates to “pleasant savory taste.” While consumers are still catching on to this taste sensation, chefs and mixologists have been toying with the concept for several years now, with no signs of stopping any time soon.

Read More

Kajitsu: A Marriage Between Zen and Umami

Kajitsu: A Marriage Between Zen and Umami

By Yamini Lal, Foodable Contributor

The Cuisine.

Shojin Ryori, or Buddhist cuisine, is vegan in nature. Developed in Buddhist monasteries, it is based on the fundamentals of non-violence. When this tradition came to Japan, it mingled with the Japanese culture of tea-drinking. That, in turn, led to the Kaiseki tradition (Japanese version of haute cuisine), a multi-course eating style focused on vegetables as the star of the meal, lovingly extracting flavors from a variety of seasonal ingredients. Kajitsu brings this cherished Asian tradition to New York in an authentic and memorable way.

Read More