4 Ways to Prevent Restaurant Burnout

4 Ways to Prevent Restaurant Burnout

We know restaurant owners, chefs, and managers, more often than not, wear too many hats, leading to upwards of 60 to 80+ hours of work per week.

No matter how much improvement we’ve collectively made in recent times to keep operations manageable, flexible, and “fun,” there still seems to be the long hours, the working on holidays and weekends, and the minimal margins. Let's not forget about the labor restraints, the rising operating costs, and the demand of the overall market to deliver quality food, drink, and experiences; all at often the lowest price point possible.

 It takes sacrifice and required systemized thinking, creativity, social skills, stress management, and a lot of passion to win in this industry— which leads to an enormous amount of personal pressure.  

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Why Systems Are Key to Culinary Success

Why Systems Are Key to Culinary Success

By Adam Lamb, Foodable Contributor

If you’re a chef who prides him/herself on your creativity then you’ll probably do anything, short of pulling your arm out of your socket, before you engage in a conversation about systems. Nothing clears a crowd or dries the mouth quicker than someone trying to convince you that systems work. Against the odds, and better judgement, allow me a moment to try.

You see, I’m not some stiff collar or management school graduate, steeped in book knowledge without the benefit of getting my ass kicked on the street. Nor was I one to suffer fools lightly; at least by those that hadn’t run a shift in my clogs. On the contrary, I was just like you; sure and steady, secure in the “why” of what I know.

I became an Executive Chef at the tender young age of 28. That first year I made plenty of mistakes; a true trial by fire if you will. My saving grace was that I had a Food & Beverage Director that believed in me and a Sous Chef that was fiercely loyal despite my inexperience and ineptitude.

Assured as I was that the hard times were over and I had learned all there was to know about successfully running a kitchen, I then took a job with a small seafood chain with a handful of properties through the Midwest and Florida coast.

I landed in Ft. Lauderdale, the southernmost restaurant, with a mission to increase sales and improve the bottom line by bringing some creativity to the menu. The chain had already established itself by offering the freshest fish and seafood possible, presented in a steadfast, if pedestrian, manner.

Consistency was key. 

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