An Interview with Asori Soto, Director of the Film Cuban Food Stories

In this episode of Food Out Loud, we meet Asori Soto, filmmaker, and director of the documentary Cuban Food Stories. The documentary takes us on a tour of Cuba through the eyes and the food of the locals.

Cuban Food Stories Movie Poster.jpg

Asori lives here in the U.S. but was born in Cuba and when given the opportunity to combine his passion for food and film he wanted to return to his homeland and capture the heritage and history of the Cuban cuisine before it changes forever.

Although it must have been tempting, the film does not take on a political message, which frankly is refreshing; instead, Asori tells the stories of traditional Cuban dishes through the people that create them. Cuban food is not talked about much like French or even Mexican cuisine. Asori wants to change that.

The film is split into chapters, each one taking us to a different place on the island, meeting new people and discovering new traditions. Some moments in the film leave you longing for a simpler time, questioning what the higher calling is. In Cuban Food Stories, you discover a culture being preserved through food and and a people who take pride in that mission. You find yourself thinking of your grandmother's cooking, for me a taste and feeling that I haven't experienced in years. It made me wonder, maybe I need to get more in tune with my heritage and the recipes my family passed down for generations before those stories start to become forgotten.




Food Out Loud: GMO Questions and Answers

The use of GMOs has been a hotbed issue in the U.S. for many decades and there are strong concerns happening on both sides of the conversation. For me historically, I have been against GMOs , I have taking part in protests and advocated against the spread of GMOs in our food ecosystem. But, working here at Foodable, I am often questioned on why I feel they way I do. Sometimes I simply do not have all the answers.  I realized that when it came to GMOs I was in a bit of an echo chamber, only talking to people who were on my side of the argument. So I started to think about what I didn’t know.

One of the biggest arguments for GMOs is the idea that we need them to feed a growing population. I realized that I don't understand enough about what it takes to feed the world, let alone what it will take to feed future generations. I also did not know exactly what was considered a GMO and how present they are in the food we eat every day.

With that in mind,  I decided that I wanted to try to find someone who was an advocate of GMOs to ask them some of the basic questions that I just simply do not have the answers to.

In this episode, I speak with Leia Flure, a GMO advocate who writes for a site called “GMO Answers.” Leia is a registered dietitian based in Champaign, Illinois. She is also an educator, has a psychology and a nutritional science degree, and is a mother - so she has to truly believe that GMOs are safe and useful. And that was what I was looking for. Someone who did not have a horse in the game, someone who did their own research and came to their own conclusions based on her own research and education. She has decided to write for “GMO Answers,” which is a partially funded by GMO companies, but her conclusions are her own.

If there is a takeaway for me from this discussion it is that we may have to separate the science from the practices of some of these companies. We all know the case of Dewayne Johnson vs. Monsanto and how that turned out. Of course, this validates a lot of my viewpoints on GMOs and the damage they can cause to people and the environment. So does the bad really outweigh the good?

This podcast may upset some hardcore proponents against GMOs and I get it, I didn't dig in and barrage my guest with rage against some of the points that I don't necessarily agree because it’s important to keep an open dialogue. But rest assured this is not a topic that I am done exploring because it is not a topic that we have come to final conclusions on. So please shoot me an email or a tweet and let me know what questions you have and I will continue this conversation.

Research by:

Nathan Mikita

Nathan Mikita

Director of New Media/Producer


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Are Meat-Free Delicatessens The Next Big Thing In Foodservice?

If 2018 wasn't 2019 will be the year of the vegan, and we should all be excited about that. Because whether you agree with it or not we all need to have more vegetables on our plates. Vegans are merely pushing the food industry to get better and challenging non-vegans to think about their food an where it comes from and what the costs are to our environment and our health.

Atlas is a Meat-Free Delicatessen that provides healthy and nutritious plant-based food, without losing sight of why people enjoy comfort food and their food quality and flavors are taking the Miami market by storm.

I got the unique opportunity to meet the founders of Atlas Meat-Free Delicatessen Ryan and Amanda Bauhaus, and to try some of their food. Their backgrounds are not in food, but these two came together as a couple, and embarked on a mission to bring delicious vegan food to the vegan or vegetarian curious.

Ryan and Amanda are aware of the stigmas the vegans have come to represent and have formulated their brand to make sure they were not preaching to people but rather inspiring people, and they are inspiring people with great food.

Ryan and Amanda call their food "low food tech" - From buttermilk fried chicken to mozzarella cheese, This is real food made through careful experimentation to make vegan food accessible, delicious, and familiar.

Show Notes

  • 14:26 - Does the word vegan have a negative connotation?

  • 19:26 - Let the food speak for itself

  • 43:13 - Ryan? Are you a mad scientist?

  • 1:50 - Meat :) Ryan and Amanda Baubaus, founders of Atlas Meat-Free Delicatessen.

  • 4:43 - Becoming Vegans

  • 10:54 - How did the idea of Atlas come about?


Research by:

Nathan Mikita

Nathan Mikita

Director of New Media/Producer


VIEW BIO

Food Out Loud: Keto, Intermittent Fasting, and Grass Fed Butter Coffee

On this episode of Food Out Loud, I interview Mark Yu, co-founder of the keto-friendly, butter coffee brand, Grass Fed Coffee. We discuss our experience with the ketogenic diet and intermittent fasting. Mark tested this diet and lifestyle on himself and after losing 45 pounds in just four months, he simply became a believer.

At this point, you should have heard about the ketogenic diet, unless you’re in a carb-induced food coma. Contrary to popular belief this diet is not about weight loss and it is not new. The roots of the ketogenic diet go back to the 1920s as a treatment for epilepsy and recently has re-emerged as a performance diet for the mind and body.

Intermittent fasting’s effect on chronic diseases like diabetes, is nothing short of astonishing. Fasting is of course not new with roots in most if not all major religions. Maybe we are rediscovering something here?

In America, we are struggling with obesity and as a result: our health. We have to take a look at what we are eating because the current American diet seems to be out of whack.

I will be talking a lot about the American diet in depth on this show because there is a lot of information to study and misinformation to debunk. I am also experimenting with my diet along the way. So, let’s get the conversation started!

SHOW NOTES

23:57 - Should everyone be drinking butter coffee?
26:01 - Will Keto have as much of an effect on food-service as gluten free did?
27:36 - Where can we get Grass Fed Butter Coffee?

01:44 - Mark Yu - Welcome to the show
06:09 - Intermittent fasting
13:16 - Keto is not Atkins
18:30 - Grass Fed butter Coffee - Yes please!
23:57 - Should everyone be drinking butter coffee?


Food Out Loud: Defining the New Consumer with Sara Brito of The Good Food 100 Media Network

In this inaugural episode of Food Out Loud, we start with the changing U.S. consumer. We have all seen this shift happening, but today it seems to be accelerating. We are all consumers in this economy, so it does not take a professional to see how our collective perception of food is changing—we are shifting to a more sustainable, healthy food ecosystem.

Sara Brito is our guest today. Brito is the founder of Good Food 100 Media Network, which is responsible for the Good Food 100 Restaurants List. The list “seeks to redefine how chefs, restaurants, and food service businesses are viewed and valued. Carefully curated based on the quantitative measurement of chefs’ purchasing practices,” as stated on the Good Food 100 website.

“We know that consumers today have a different set of values,” Says Brito.

Most of us are making more educated choices when we eat. That stretches from having less soda or high sugar drinks with your burger and fries to going completely plant-based on one or more days a week. Of course, there are some of us that have drastically changed our diet. This is why we started this show—because of these choices that we are making collectively and the potential for massive positive change in how our society relates to food.

Listen to the podcast above to hear the full conversation about good food and the impact on our food industry.

SHOW NOTES

01:42 - Welcoming Sara Brito Founder of The Good Food 100 Media Network
05:33 The Good Food 100 Restaurant List
17:03 - How is Food In America Changing?
21:44 - GMO Labeling and The Need for Transparency

24:47 - What's it like Working with Kimbal Musk?
26:08 - What is the Effect of Media on Today's Consumer?
28:40 - We are Moving to a More Responsible Food Industry