Why are CBD Edibles Being Pulled Off Restaurants in Some Parts of the Country?

Across various parts of the country, health department officials are asking restaurants to voluntarily pull CBD-infused foods and drinks off menus.

The latest local and regional governments that have reportedly taken steps against CBD are New York City, California, Texas, and Ohio banning the substance from restaurants and retail stores.

For example, according to the New York City’s official government website, beginning July 1, New York City restaurants that don’t comply with the CBD ban voluntarily could be embargoed of their CBD products by the health department... and by October 1, officials “will begin issuing violations to restaurants and retailers for offering CBD-laced foods and drinks. Violations may be subject to fines as well as violation points that count toward the establishment’s letter grade.”

CBD, or cannabidiol, which derives from cannabis, doesn’t cause the psychoactive effects for the lack of enough THC—the compound that gives people the “high” sensation.

In fact, CBD proponents claim the substance is mainly used for its therapeutic benefits helping people relax, ease pain, anxiety, insomnia, and even depression.

Despite the fact that not many studies have been done on cannabidiol in human trials, as pointed out by a recent New York Times article, we are seeing an immense amount of CBD products being sold across the country, with Walgreens as the latest retailer to announce plans to sell creams, patches, and sprays in nearly 1,500 stores in select states.

So, why is it being pulled out of the restaurant space, specifically?

Although, the farm bill that was passed in December 2018 legalized industrial hemp in the U.S., this only means industrial hemp was removed from the controlled substance category. Anything that is put in foods and drinks has to be regulated by the Food and Drug Administration and, as of right now, CBD is not determined safe or effective for other health conditions aside from being an active ingredient in an approved drug that treats two rare and severe forms of epilepsy.

The FDA regulations are something different and there’s a huge push from lawmakers to change this.

Since there is no federal law specifically addressing CBD-laced edibles, some states, like Colorado and Maine, have already attempted to clarify the status of the substance by passing laws allowing the addition of CBD to food, as reported by Reuters. California and Texas have introduced bi-partisan legislation to do the same, as reported by the Associated Press.

Last week, the FDA slated the first public hearing to take place May 31 to discuss how to regulate CBD food and beverage products.

In the meantime, here at Foodable, we are tracking the latest in this arena:

In a podcast episode of Chef AF, Chef Brandon Foster shares with us a personal anecdote about how CBD has positively affected a local farmer to The point where this person wanted to dedicate the rest of his available land to grow hemp for the CBD industry.

In an On Foodable Feature episode, our host Layla Harrison breaks down for our audience some of the CBD-infused products that have stood out from the rest.

And in a Barron Report podcast episode, we learned about Azuca— a company offering CBD and THC products ranging from edibles to sweet syrups.

We expect to continue hearing about ‘Culinary Cannabis’ and its impact on the restaurant business and society as a whole. so, stay tuned for more interesting content!

Food Out Loud: GMO Questions and Answers

The use of GMOs has been a hotbed issue in the U.S. for many decades and there are strong concerns happening on both sides of the conversation. For me historically, I have been against GMOs , I have taking part in protests and advocated against the spread of GMOs in our food ecosystem. But, working here at Foodable, I am often questioned on why I feel they way I do. Sometimes I simply do not have all the answers.  I realized that when it came to GMOs I was in a bit of an echo chamber, only talking to people who were on my side of the argument. So I started to think about what I didn’t know.

One of the biggest arguments for GMOs is the idea that we need them to feed a growing population. I realized that I don't understand enough about what it takes to feed the world, let alone what it will take to feed future generations. I also did not know exactly what was considered a GMO and how present they are in the food we eat every day.

With that in mind,  I decided that I wanted to try to find someone who was an advocate of GMOs to ask them some of the basic questions that I just simply do not have the answers to.

In this episode, I speak with Leia Flure, a GMO advocate who writes for a site called “GMO Answers.” Leia is a registered dietitian based in Champaign, Illinois. She is also an educator, has a psychology and a nutritional science degree, and is a mother - so she has to truly believe that GMOs are safe and useful. And that was what I was looking for. Someone who did not have a horse in the game, someone who did their own research and came to their own conclusions based on her own research and education. She has decided to write for “GMO Answers,” which is a partially funded by GMO companies, but her conclusions are her own.

If there is a takeaway for me from this discussion it is that we may have to separate the science from the practices of some of these companies. We all know the case of Dewayne Johnson vs. Monsanto and how that turned out. Of course, this validates a lot of my viewpoints on GMOs and the damage they can cause to people and the environment. So does the bad really outweigh the good?

This podcast may upset some hardcore proponents against GMOs and I get it, I didn't dig in and barrage my guest with rage against some of the points that I don't necessarily agree because it’s important to keep an open dialogue. But rest assured this is not a topic that I am done exploring because it is not a topic that we have come to final conclusions on. So please shoot me an email or a tweet and let me know what questions you have and I will continue this conversation.

Research by:

Nathan Mikita

Nathan Mikita

Director of New Media/Producer


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How FoodLogiQ Had a Role In Helping Small Businesses Through the Romaine Lettuce Scare

In this episode of On Foodable, Paul Barron sits down with Bryan Cohn, Food Safety Solution Engineer at FoodLogiQ, at the Winter Fancy Food Show in San Francisco. The two chat about food safety compliance, whole chain traceability, and supply chain transparency solutions.

Cohn does a good job at explaining how FoodLogiQ works with businesses to accomplish its mission of mapping out the world’s supply chain to promote food safety and traceability.

“What FoodLogiQ is able to do is... automate their work flows, meaning being able to get documentation of suppliers, ingredients, products into a cloud system so they can be shared across organizations and then decisions can be made,” says Cohn.

One of the most recent food safety issues that FoodLogiQ had a role to play in had to do the with the recent Romaine Lettuce scare.

“Some of our clients leveraged our technology to understand where Romaine was within their respective supply chains,” Cohn shared with Paul. Thanks to FoodLogiQ, its clients were able to “justify their supply chain and their product path and journey.”

Companies like Tyson Foods and Subway have invested in the software firm hoping that more suppliers jump on board and begin to digitize their paperwork in order to have everything organized in one cloud.

To learn more about FoodLogiQ it’s processes and what challenges they face, check out the video above!

Video Produced by:

Vanessa Rodriguez

Vanessa Rodriguez

Writer & Producer


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How Food Safety is Marketable

Audits, cleaning schedules, SOP's, and a glowing health department inspection are a marketing advantage. Identifying key elements in your operation to keep media recognition positive makes sense. Is there a balance between clean and museum-like? Form and function strike a balance with the right systems, people using tools and brainpower that matter.

“I always look for the place where I would want to eat after I am done doing the inspection,” said “Grace.”

Grace is a department of health inspector in the mid-Atlantic whose identity is being kept concealed for her privacy as well as those locations which she inspects. Grace tells of stories of cockroaches left bobbing in salad dressing, seeing blood dripping from a cook’s open wound into meatball mixture, and “that one time I saw a dishwasher using glass cleaner in the sanitizing sink in place of sanitizer,” amongst others.

Her tales of ill and disgust are numerous. But so are stories of stand-out operations that take customer safety as a guiding light. We know what bad publicity does - ask our friends at Chipotle how the last few years have gone.

Market food safety like any other marketable element of your operation to earn repeat business and shine as a professional establishment. 

Shuttershock

Shuttershock

Violation-Free and Proud!

“I make visits, usually, twice per year. Those are two good opportunities to impress me. If I am there any other time, it is because we have a problem,” said Grace. “A visit outside the two routines [stops] means that somebody has called [the health department] after being sick. That usually isn’t a good day for everybody involved.”

But what about a really good routine visit?

Most municipalities archive health department reports online for anybody to review. Take the A+ report card and make an Instagram post. Celebrate with your team and reward their work, while making that highlight a point of public engagement.

The FDA Food Code stipulates that the most recent health department inspection be available for the visitors to your operation to review.

Have a glowing report? Blow it up and hang it for all to see.

“One of the restaurants in my area posts [my] report in their bathroom stalls with a sign above it: ‘Relax and enjoy a healthy shit - Our food didn’t make you sick!’ While absolutely laughable, it is also a memorable experience that is sure to make its way into a discussion. That’s good marketing.

Shutterstock

Shutterstock

Audits aren’t Just for the IRS

Self-policing is better than, you know, the actual police, or in this case, an extra visit from the health department.

Dropping an audit tool into standard operating procedures means you never need to get ready for an inspection.

“I can always tell when there is panic in the kitchen when I visit,” said Grace. “You really aren’t hiding anything. There is nothing you can fix when I am walking through the dining room on my way [into the kitchen.] Forget it! Just always be ready.”

Many successful operations either engage a third-party sanitation auditor or use their own auditing tool. Grace says that "the dishwasher company or chemical suppliers often have services included in the cost of leasing a [dish] machine that will conduct cleaning audits.”

An audit tool can be twenty areas, or more,  of concentration or concern that is completed in check-box form by, say, a junior member of management.

Why? They learn what to look for and then share the information with the staff. The responsibility can even be passed around so there are always fresh insights.

More advice from Grace? Train the way you fight, fight the way you train. Expect every day to bring a health department visit and there will never be an issue. You owe it to your customers. Taking temperatures of chicken, logging refrigerator temps, and using the right sanitizer concentration should be the habit, not a one-off when there is an official visit.

What is too clean?

Share information about cleaning regimens across social platforms. Post a Boomerang video of deck-mopping the kitchen. No need to show the super gross stuff - like pumping out the grease trap - but put a highlight on your commitment to a clean operation by humanizing the hard work that goes into a solid facility.

No need to make every FaceBook post about cleaning, though. Overload starts to raise red flags, for customers and staff. Standard operating procedures and master cleaning schedules work in concert with daily cleaning routines, front-of-the-house ‘sparkle’ sessions, and regular maintenance. Ask staff for their input on what they feel needs a little extra attention, keeping in mind it is a kitchen, not a museum. There will be errant smudges, splatters, and stains. Commit to a food-safe operation without making the staff neurotic.

Shutterstock

Shutterstock

Advertise the Occasional Shut-Down

As much as we don’t like it, there are slow days. There is the predictable downturn, say, after New Years and before the Valentine’s Day rush. Make the most of a slouching Monday by advertising a day “Committed to Cleaning.”

You were going to do a deep clean anyhow; take advantage of the time by sharing the news.

“I have seen several places put a sign on the door about being closed for cleaning. They missed an opportunity. They should have said something like, ‘Hey! We are closed today so we can make sure your next visit is great,’ or something like that. Make it look like something they [the restaurant] wanted to do, not had to do.”

When Grace is gone, the next steps are up to you. But she will be back.

Engage staff in a formal, recognized food safety training, provide the right cleaning tools and food safety resources, and then tell the world about your seriously healthy operation. Use your website to share the latest self-audit and explain your food safety commitment.

Either you do or the health department will, but maybe not the way you want.

Walmart's Blockchain Technology Can Give Consumers Product Traceability

You’ve probably heard about blockchain as it was initially developed for, the cryptocurrency Bitcoin. But now the technology in the cryptocurrency context is being developed for the foodservice industry.

Blockchain, as defined by Investopedia is a digitized, decentralized, public ledger of all cryptocurrency transactions. Constantly growing as ‘completed’ blocks (the most recent transactions) are recorded and added to it in chronological order, it allows market participants to keep track of digital currency transactions without central record keeping. Each node (a computer connected to the network) gets a copy of the blockchain, which is downloaded automatically.

Most recently, in the food service space, blockchain can be seen used by Walmart and Sam’s Club. The grocery giant has been working closely with IBM to create a digitized handheld system that will allow farmers to give consumers full traceability with a produce product.

The blockchain technology is currently open to those in Walmart’s leafy green food supply chain, in an attempt to ease concern with recent outbreaks in lettuce.

The system will be used to report to stakeholders where a particular head of lettuce came from, during what harvest, and on what particular farm. Allowing government investigators to have a clearer investigation if a consumer gets sick. As opposed to tracking down the tainted lettuce for days, they can find the source within seconds, ideally meaning less wasted produce, less sick people and boosting confidence in the food system.

Will blockchain technology transform the food industry? Learn more in the video above and read more at “Forbes”!