Villa Maria’s Private Bin Sauvignon Blanc Differentiates Itself from the Rest In the Category

On this episode of On Foodable filmed at Foodable.io Seattle sponsored by Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute, we get to learn a little from Rob Bigelow, Senior Director of Wine Education and On Premise Development at Ste. Michelle Wine Estates, about a New Zealand winery—Villa Maria Wine Estate—that the company is in partnership with.

“When I think about New Zealand and the wines, obviously the first answer is Sauvignon Blanc,” says Bigelow.
Some of the characteristics of New Zealand Sauvignon Blancs, which make up two-thirds to three-quarters of all the vineyards in the region, are: “... crisp, aromatic, lovely, perfect with seafood,” as mentioned by Bigelow.

The wine that is featured in this episode is the Private Bin Sauvignon Blanc, which is top rated at 90 points.

“The Private Bin Sauvignon Blanc has a sort of a broader mid-palate which means it’s lusher on the palette more sort of melon, floral aromas…,” says Bigelow. The grapes are actually sourced from a combination of two valleys in the Marlborough region, which helps provide maximum flavor, balance, and quality to the wine.

Ste. Michelle Wine Estates is a collection of distinctive wines estates, located in the Pacific Northwest, California, and abroad. The company provides administrative and financial support for each wine property it does business with. Ste. Michelle’s company philosophy is to allow each wine estate/vineyard to have all wine-making decisions “made on site by the people who grow the grapes and make the wine” as stated in the company website.

Villa Maria Wine Estates, for example, is a family-owned winery located in Marlborough island and is recognized as New Zealand’s most awarded winery thanks to its winemaker being fanatical about quality. The winery focuses on low yields and discards all imperfect grapes.

Watch the episode above to learn more about Villa Maria Wine Estates and its sustainability efforts!

How Rich's Helps Define Clean Label and Sustainability

Consumers are demanding authenticity.

Authenticity in their products, foods, brands, you name it.

On this episode of The Barron Report, Jen VanDewater, Vice President of Health and Authenticity at Rich Products Corporation, sits down with our host Paul Barron to discuss how a large company like Rich’s is addressing consumer concerns over clean labeling and authenticity when it boils down to the products they offer.

Listen above to learn more about this company’s sustainability and social efforts!


Show Notes:

  • 03:57 - Driving Factor Pushing Companies To Make Changes

  • 04:32 - Defining Clean Label

  • 06:47 - How Rich's Monitors The Market

  • 08:29 - Social Trends Monitoring

  • 10:47 - Trends In The Marketplace

  • 11:38 - Customer Portfolio Analysis

  • 13:06 - Verifying If Products have a Clean Label

  • 14:16 - How Rich's Looks at Data around Clean Label

  • 18:31 - Trends in Consumer Demand

  • 22:52 - Real Meaning of Sustainability

  • 26:08 - Rich's Sustainability Efforts

  • 28:22 - Operators Attitudes Towards Sustainability

 
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These Emerging CEOs In Specialty Food Use International Ingredients In a Unique Way

These Emerging CEOs In Specialty Food Use International Ingredients In a Unique Way

This year's Summer Fancy Food Show was full of innovative specialty products helping reimagine the future of food. Foodable welcomed more than 15 innovators to the SFA Live Stage where hot industry topics were discussed and new fascinating products were introduced. The following two Emerging CEOs are introducing flavors from abroad to delight American consumers and foodservice professionals, alike. Scroll below to see the full interviews with each.

Mike Kurtz, Founder of Mike’s Hot Honey

A life-long pizza and spicy food lover, Mike Kurtz found the inspiration for Mike’s Hot Honey from Brazil, out of all places.

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Mexico Imposes Retaliatory Tariffs on $3 Billion Worth of U.S. Goods

Mexico Imposes Retaliatory Tariffs on $3 Billion Worth of U.S. Goods

Mexico retaliated against the Trump Administration last week by imposing tariffs on about $3 billion worth of American pork, steel, cheese, and other goods, according to the New York Times. This is in response to levies imposed by the Trump administration on steel and aluminum.

This tax war brings to light the increasingly strained relationship between the two countries as they work to rewrite the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA.)

Farmers, who are among those most vulnerable to the Mexican tariffs, said the tariffs would devastate American agriculture.

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This Humble Seaweed Snack Company Will Make $10 Million This Year

This Humble Seaweed Snack Company Will Make $10 Million This Year

Today’s successful brands all seem to have a number of highly successful characteristics in common. Maybe they’ve positioned themselves as “the first”, maybe they’re focused on being healthy, or being authentic, or maybe they just have a great story. But these brands usually tend to have another attribute in common; they’ve got some money to get started

But sometimes, brands have just the right combination of successful attributes to become booming businesses. 

SeaSnax, for example, began as a mother-father team who just wanted to give their daughter a better alternative to the unhealthy, high-sodium, corn oil-laden seaweed snacks that were already on the market. According to Entrepreneur, Jin Jun began experimenting in her kitchen and soon had the first snack approved by her seaweed-loving toddler, combining the flavors of seaweed, olive oil, and salt. 

At that point, Jun and her husband found a manufacturing facility to make the snacks. They maxed out their credit cards to pay for their first orders. 

"They really thought we were crazy and that we were wasting our time and money," Jun says.

It wasn’t easy from the get-go. Jun and her snacks were rejected from every farmer’s market in LA. She was on the phone six hours a day trying to sell the snacks, only sleeping 3 hours a day until she was able to get her snacks on the shelves at a local Whole Foods. Then, Yahoo featured SeaSnax as one of the "10 healthiest snacks" on their homepage. 

Today, SeaSnax are sold at 6,000 stores around the world and have expanded to include an array of different flavors and items like seaweed flakes and a salad mix. 

This year, the company is on track to do $10 million in sales. The trick to their success?Authenticity. 

"It was a combination of sincerity and naivety. We were able to build a very loyal customer following… because I hear time and time again that people can trust us," Jun says. "My daughter sets the bar. If I wouldn't feed it to my daughter, I wouldn't feed it to a customer."

SeaSnax doesn't even really have a marketing plan.

“[W]hat has worked for our brand is our sincerity and our willingness to share and give. We don't spend a whole lot of money on fancy shows or websites or paying for Facebook likes. Everything we've ever done is not advertised, it's done quietly and humbly.”

For more on this story, visit “Entrepreneur.”

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