Foodable Network Launches Chef AF a New Podcast

Today, Foodable is launching a new podcast — Chef AF, It’s All Food!— with Chef Jim Berman.

You may have already found out about the newest podcast addition to our show library, through The Barron Report’s latest piece where listeners had the chance to learn more about the chef and host.

Chef Berman has not only been a longtime Foodable expert contributor, but he’s also been a food writer for multiple publications while simultaneously working in and out of kitchens across the U.S.

Now, as the host of Chef AF, Chef Berman will have the chance to get his peers to “talk shop,” as he likes to say, in order to help other chefs and restaurant industry professionals navigate the wonderful yet complex kitchen life.

Chef AF, It’s All Food! is officially launching on Foodable Network today and it will soon be available in iTunes, Google Play and Spotify and other podcast listening platforms.

Listen to the first episode above to meet Berman and learn what you can expect to get from this new podcast!

Westward's Chef Will Gordon Shares His Matbucha Braised Wild Alaska Pollock Recipe

On this episode of On Foodable, we are featuring Chef Will Gordon, former Executive Chef of Westward, a Seattle restaurant located directly on the north shores of Lake Union. Chef Gordon will be working with wild Alaska pollock, provided by Trident Seafoods, to make a delicious Matbucha Braised Wild Alaska Pollock dish. This is the last episode out of our four-part series of chef demos that were filmed at our Foodable.io Seattle event, sponsored by the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute.

About the Dish

Wild Alaska Pollock Braised in Matbucha with Preserved Lemon Cream, Charred Shishito Peppers and Herbs

Wild Alaska Pollock is an underutilized, sustainable fish species.

Wild Alaska Pollock is an underutilized, sustainable fish species.


Ingredients:

  • 6 ea. / skinned, Wild Alaska Pollock Fillets

  • 1 recipe Matbucha

  • Lemon juice

  • Extra virgin olive oil

  • 1 pt preserved lemon crema

  • 24 ea. medium-sized shishito peppers washed

  • 3 pts mixed pickled herbs: parsley, mint, and dill

  • Finishing salt


Method of Cooking:

This recipe serves 6 people. Preheat your oven to 400 degrees.  Heat up matbucha in two saute pans its oven proof handles (thin with a little bit of vegetable stock, water or tomato juice to the consistency of tomato sauce). When it is at a nice simmer, nestle in three portions of fish per pan, leaving space between each piece. Move to oven and bake for about 5 minutes, or until the fish is just done and flaky.  While the fish is in the oven, blister the shishito peppers in a hot, dry pan until black spots occur, and they are just cooked. Remove to a plate on the side.

After you remove the pans of fish from the oven, gently remove all of your fish to a plate off to the side. Put the matbucha back on the stove and reduce down if it needs it. Add a little olive oil, salt or lemon as necessary to make it taste as you like.  


Plating:

  • To serve, spoon some matbucha on each plate, nestle a few shishitos in the matbucha as well as your fish. Garnish with dollops of the preserved lemon cream and herbs that have been lightly dressed in extra virgin olive oil and salt.

Westward

“Westward is a restaurant with a real sense of place,” says Chef Gordon. “You can sit on the deck there, on the patio and look out and see all of Seattle… and eat oysters or eat a nice piece of fish out of our wood-fired oven and it’s like no where else in the world.”

To hear Will Gordon’s thoughts about what the role of a chef is today and to replicate his delicious sustainable fish dish, follow along by watching the episode above!

Chef David Glass, from Ethan Stowell Restaurants, Demonstrates His Lemon & Thyme Stuffed Wild Alaska Pollock Dish

On this episode of On Foodable, we are featuring Chef David Glass, from Ethan Stowell Restaurants’ Staple and Fancy Mercantile located in the Seattle neighborhood of Ballard. Chef Glass will be working with wild Alaska pollock, provided by Trident Seafoods, to make a beautiful Lemon and Thyme Stuffed Wild Alaska Pollock dish. This is the third episode out of our four-part series of chef demos that were filmed at our Foodable.io Seattle event, sponsored by the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute.

About the Dish

Wild Alaska Pollock, stuffed with Thyme and Lemon, with Brown Butter Cauliflower and Salsa Verde

Wild Alaska Pollock is an underutilized, sustainable fish species.

Wild Alaska Pollock is an underutilized, sustainable fish species.


Ingredients:

  • 2 ea. / skin on Wild Alaska Pollock Fillets

  • 1 lemon, sliced 1/4 inch thick

  • 3 sprigs of thyme

  • 1 cup cauliflower florets 

  • 1/4 cup capers, rinsed

  • 1/4 lb butter

  • 1Tbs extra virgin olive oil

  • 1/4 cup picked parsley, fried

  • 1/4 cup picked sage, fried

  • 1 lemon, juice of


Method of Cooking:

Take the two skin-on fillets and lay slices of lemon and thyme in between. Tie the fish with butcher’s twine to secure the two filets together. Sear the cauliflower in the olive oil. Add the capers and butter. Allow butter to brown and add the lemon juice to stop the browning process. Grill the fish on both sides (about 4 minutes per side).


Plating:

  • Plate the fish, snipping and carefully removing the twine, and top with cauliflower, caper and butter mix. Top with crispy parsley and sage. 

Staple & Fancy

At Staple and Fancy there’s a focus on seafood and utilizing the abundance of quality local resources that are available to chefs in the city of Seattle. For Chef Glass, sustainability is a personal responsibility.

“As a chef it’s easy to think about today and tomorrow or just cooking for now,” said Chef Glass. “But when we look at the big picture and we look at five years from now…, twenty years from now and the impact of the use of the ingredients we have today on the future it’s important for us to have thought in the product that we use and ensure that we’re using product that is gonna be sustainable and it’s going to be available for our children.”

Essentially, he would hate “for species to become extinct and no one would have the chance to taste them again.”

To replicate this delicious sustainable dish follow along by watching the episode above!

Tom Douglas' Corporate Executive Chef, Chris Schwartz, Shows Off His Skills with a Pan-Roasted Wild Alaska Pollock Dish

On this episode of On Foodable, Executive Chef Chris Schwartz from Tom Douglas Restaurants explains the newfound role of being a chef in today’s day and age and why it’s important to continue looking for new resources to cook with.

Chef Schwartz mentions, “When people come to Seattle, they automatically want Halibut, Salmon, or Dungeness Crab, which is great. But, as you know, those (resources) are limited to a certain extent, so we have to be on the forefront of figuring out what else is out there.”

During Foodable.io Seattle, Chef Schwartz prepares a unique dish using wild Alaska pollock, provided by Trident Seafoods. The wild Alaska pollock is paired with harissa, moroccan-like chili paste, used to glaze a newaukum delicata squash. Chef Schwartz tops his dish off with a drizzle of a charred jalapeno-basil vinaigrette, giving another kick of flavor and spice to the overall dish.

About Pan-Roasted Wild Alaska Pollock with Harissa and Honey-Roasted Newaukum Delicata Squash


dish2.jpg

About the Dish

Ingredients:

Harissa Glaze

  • 6 oz. Harissa Paste

  • 1 oz. Red Wine Vinegar

  • ½ Red Onion, minced

  • Lemon Juice, ½ of lemon

  • 1 oz. Warm Water

  • ½ c. Olive Oil

  • ¼ c. Honey

  • 4T. Chopped Parsley

Preparation:

  1. Combine all ingredients and season with salt and pepper.

Charred Jalapeno-Basil Vinaigrette

  • ¾ c. Red Onion, diced

  • ¼ c. Red Wine Vinegar

  • ¼ c. Apple Cider Vinegar

  • 1 ½ T. Salt

  • 4ea. Jalapenos

  • 4ea. Red Fresco Chilis

  • ¼ c. Honey

  • 1 ½ T. Dijon Mustard

  • 1T. Garlic, finely chopped

Preparation

  1. Combine the first four listed ingredients and let sit for ten minutes

2. Begin preparing jalapenos and Fresco chilis by removing the ends and cores from each

3. Slightly char in a pan with olive oil (keep them firm)

4. Add to mixture when ready (season with salt, pepper and chopped basil as needed)

Harissa and Honey Roasted Newaukum Delicata Squash

  • 1 Newaukum Delicata Squash

Preparation

  1. Remove seeds from squash and slice into half-sized rings

  2. Toss in Harissa glaze and season with salt and pepper

  3. Preheat oven to 450°F and cook on sheet pan for 20 minutes

Pan-Roasted Wild Alaska Pollock

  • 4ea. 4-6 oz. Skin-on Pollock Fillets

  • 1 Tbsp. Unsalted Butter

  • Salt and Pepper

Preparation:

  1. Heat saute pan over medium-low heat

  2. Rub olive oil on fillets then place in saute pan (skin side down)

  3. Quick saute each side for 3-4 minutes, adding butter in between to baste fillets


Executive Chef Chris Schwartz has spent the last 30 years in the restaurant industry overseeing, leading and managing kitchens, along with a small army of chefs, sous chefs and cooks. He is an invaluable leader to Tom Douglas and his business-partner wife, Jackie Cross. The couple own and operate 14 restaurants, including Seatown Market Diner, another successful Seattle-based Douglas restaurant. Their variety of offerings can be enjoyed during any season, whether you’re staying warm with chowder during the winter or cooling off with a seafood cocktail during the summer!


Big Food is Fostering Innovation

Large corporations have been noticing how consumers have been favoring products made by independent startup food companies, since a good chunk of those provide craft, high-quality, niche, and, a lot of times, healthier products.

Needless to say, big food wants in. Especially, since this specialty food segment has a tremendous growth potential.

So, how is big food seeking innovation?

Companies like Campbell Soup, Chobani, Kellogg, Kraft Heinz, Nestlé, PepsiCo, and Tyson Foods are creating innovation centers and/or partnering with existing incubators to help niche brands grow and flourish.

PepsiCo

Pepsico’s new center for innovation is called “The Hive.”

According to Food Dive, “this incubator will be a separate entrepreneurial group outside of the core headquarters that will help nurture niche products already in the portfolio,” like for example Stubborn Soda.

As Foodable has reported in the past, PepsiCo also partnered with a Chicago-based, food and beverage incubator, The Hatchery, in order to look at other startup brands that have the potential of becoming a possible venture for the beverage giant.

Tyson Foods

Earlier this year, Tyson Foods announced that it will be working with two incubators—Plug and Play and 1871—linking the food giant to innovation hailing from Silicon Valley and Chicago.

That’s not the first time Tyson showed it’s commitment for innovation. In fact, the company launched a venture capital fund in late 2016 “to invest in companies developing breakthrough technologies, business models and products to sustainably feed the growing world population,” according to the company website.

Since then, Tyson has invested in brands like for example Beyond Meat, that promote sustainability and others that promote the internet of food, like FoodLogiq.

Tyson is spearheading innovation through its own brand, ¡Yappah!, which aims to fight food waste by utilizing “forgotten” ingredients like rescued vegetable puree and spent grain to make protein crisps, and investments in companies like Future Meat Technologies, an Israel-based “biotechnology company aiming to transform global meat production through distributive manufacturing of fat and muscle cells, increasing food safety and reducing ecological impact worldwide,” as stated in the company’s website.

Chobani

Chobani is another company looking to foster innovation through its Food Tech Residency. The company set out specific challenges in the food and agriculture value chain they would like to tackle (like food waste, food safety, water conservation, logistics, etc.) and invites like-minded, early-stage tech and agriculture startups to apply for funding.

Currently, the brand is hosting it’s fourth incubator class, since it launched the program in 2016, with companies developing products like tea, hummus and allergen-free baking ingredients. Alongside the food startups, two tech companies will be participating in Chobani’s inaugural Tech Residency Program—CinderBio and Skyven Technologies.

Watch the video above to learn more and stay tuned to other Industry Pulse episodes to keep up with all the innovation happening around your business! To learn about other consumer trends involving sustainability like plant-based meals, watch the video below: