GrubHub Partners With Yelp to Offer Delivery From More than 80,000 Restaurants

GrubHub Partners With Yelp to Offer Delivery From More than 80,000 Restaurants

According to a report from the Wall Street Journal, GrubHub and Yelp have expanded their partnership. GrubHub delivery will now be made available from twice as many restaurants on the Yelp website bringing the total number of restaurants to more than 80,000.

This move may prove to be extremely beneficial for GrubHub who has been feeling tension with the many food delivery companies like UberEats and DoorDash trying to grab the top spot.

This partnership with Yelp is actually the last step in what has been a major move for GrubHub. The food delivery giant acquired Eat24 for $288 million. This partnership is aimed at not only garnering more market visibility but also increasing convenience and cutting delivery fees and delivery time. Digital Trends says ”if multiple orders are generated through Yelp, drivers will be able to make multiple deliveries on a single trip.”

“I see a point where we could conceivably have extremely low if not free delivery for consumers,” GrubHub co-founder and Chief Executive Officer Matt Maloney told The Wall Street Journal.

Yelp is adding to the pot as well by trying to up their game as customer’s first stop before a dining experience. With this new focus on delivery, Yelp just released a list of the top-ranked restaurants on their site that offer delivery through their app.

With even super-cheap restaurants like McDonald’s and Taco Bell adding themselves to the delivery game, delivery companies will need to figure out how to get delivery prices below the price of a dollar menu meal if they want to scrape up that market.  

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Albertsons Will Launch a Digital Marketplace To Better Compete with Amazon

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Shoppers are oftentimes choosing to buy local or start-up brands as opposed to household or national names. Amazon, for example, was able to get ahead at identifying well-performing smaller brands through the Whole Foods acquisition. Some grocers are taking notice.

This is part of the reason why Albertsons decided to launch a digital marketplace for smaller brands.

“The effort comes as retailers more and more are looking to data to help guide their buying decisions,” as reported by “CNBC.”

By having a centralized point where products are easy to find, track and hard data can be collected to determine which brands are performing best it will not only benefit consumers but grocers and smaller brands alike.

“Armed with data from the marketplace, brands can make their case for shelf space in Albertsons' stores, according to “CNBC.” “On the flip side, the data Albertsons has access to through its efforts will help it better understand its customers.”

Vendors who can handle their own shipments will be the first ones able to participate in the marketplace. There’s a possibility that in the future Albertsons may jump in and aid vendors with shipment responsibilities.

This initiative comes after the grocer launched Albertsons Performance Media, “a digital media capability that provides brands the opportunity to use proprietary shopper data to drive sales across Albertsons Companies’ network of more than 2,300 stores in 35 states,” as described in a company press release.

Will Albertson be able to compete with Amazon through their efforts? Looks like they are on the right path to be a strong contender.

To learn more, read “CNBC.”

 

 

HelloFresh Finds Success in U.S. Surpassing Blue Apron in Customer Growth

HelloFresh Finds Success in U.S. Surpassing Blue Apron in Customer Growth

Since the German meal-kit service, HelloFresh, went public late last year, the company more than doubled its customer base in the United States. This is thanks to its wise investment in marketing, which has propelled the business forward surpassing its biggest competitor— Blue Apron.

“HelloFresh’s customer base also grew to 1.5 million globally, making it much bigger than Blue Apron, whose customer base shrank 15 percent to 746,000 due to lowered marketing spending,” as reported by “Recode.” It’s important to note that “HelloFresh includes customers who’ve received free boxes toward its customer total while Blue Apron only counts paying customers,” which obviously adds to its overall customer count.

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David Chang's Delivery-Only Restaurant "Ando" Acquired By UberEats

David Chang's Delivery-Only Restaurant "Ando" Acquired By UberEats

David Chang’s delivery-only restaurant, Ando, announced Monday that they have been acquired by UberEats.

It’s an interesting move for the delivery giant after Foodable reported on Uber’s jump into building virtual restaurants in established kitchens. It seems the next chapter for UberEats is producing their own food to deliver.

Uber is already on par to dominate the food delivery sector in 2018. “We’ll be the largest food delivery company in the world this year,” Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi said Monday at DLD in Munich.

According to the notice on Ando’s homepage, the company is shutting down its service, effective immediately, as it begins to integrate with Uber Eats. Since launching in May 2016, the company had been working with Uber Eats as a delivery partner, alongside other delivery services and a few of its own people.

UberEverything, the portion of the business not focused on ride-hailing, is run by Jason Droege who said in a statement, “We are committed to investing in technology that helps consumers, delivery and restaurant partners alike. Ando’s insights will help our restaurant technology team as we work with our restaurant partners to grow their business.”

It sounds like Uber will be combining their proprietary technology, which has allowed the business to anticipate and fill gaps in food offerings, with Ando’s technology, though Ando has not specifically said what their role will be in the new partnership.

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Blue Apron Faces Layoffs After Lukewarm IPO

Blue Apron Faces Layoffs After Lukewarm IPO

On Wednesday, Blue Apron announced it will be implementing “a company-wide realignment of personnel to support its strategic priorities.”

Since going public in June of this year, Blue Apron has been hard at work fixing operational issues in order to grow subscriber numbers and also please investors’ expectations.

As Foodable reported in August, the first quarter report for Blue Apron revealed a surprising $238 million in revenue, a disappointing $31.6 million in losses, and a decline in subscribers (from 1 million to 938,000 customers) leading to a drop in shares.

Since then, the company has been forced to shrink its marketing budget, laid off 14 recruiters and launched a podcast in an effort to become more of a lifestyle brand around home cooking.

Now, the meal-kit competitor is faced to lay off approximately 6 percent of its staff across both corporate offices and fulfillment centers—  that figure will “probably amount to more than 250 layoffs” according to “TechCrunch.”

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