Justin Beckett

Justin Beckett
271.59
SOCIAL SCORE

Facebook: @BeckettsTable

Instagram: @BeckettsTable

Most chefs start their culinary career in some kitchen capacity- sous chef, line cook, or something along those lines. But Justin Beckett started from the very bottom rung: as a dishwasher in Maui. With his lifelong passion for cooking, Justin has established himself as one of America’s premier chefs and has helped bring fine dining in Arizona to new levels.

Justin’s passion for cooking has also instilled in him an obsession with creating new dishes and evoking new flavors in his meals. As Justin puts it, “The best part of my job is playing with food. Coming up with new dishes is always exciting…I love seeing the guests in the restaurant; it’s like throwing a dinner party every night.” With this attitude towards cooking, it should come as no surprise that the idea for Justin’s restaurant, Beckett’s Table, was born when Justin and his wife Michelle were eating dinner with friends, sommeliers Katie and Scott Stephens. Their love for family-style meals and the fun of bonding over a good meal and good wine led them to open Beckett’s Table in 2010, and since then, Beckett’s Table earned the 2015 “Wine Spectator” award. Not to be outdone, Justin has also been nominated for the “Best New Chef” award by Food & Wine magazine.

Top Dishes

Grits & Sausage - 100% delicious. #beckettstable #eatlocalaz #cometogether

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Short ribs are how we do the weekend. #beckettstable

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You and BT. Dinner and scallops. #beckettstable

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Specialties & Resources

The menu at Beckett’s Table attempts to capture the convivial atmosphere that comes when friends share a table, a delicious meal, and a great bottle of wine to go with it. The menu is contemporary American and focuses largely on making the best out of simpler dishes. The starter offerings include creamy grits and sausage with mustard jus; wood oven roasted Brussels sprouts with bacon and lemon basil vinaigrette; chilled beets with crispy leek rings, cucumber, garlic potato puree, black pepper honey and micro herbs; feta with grilled lemon, smoked onions, green olives, roasted garlic and toast.

The entrees are equally unadorned and delicious. Some of the items include short ribs with creamy mashed potatoes, sautéed vegetables and a red onion demi-glace; cast-iron petite chicken with bacon biscuit stuffing and chicken jus; pan-seared sea scallops with green beans, potatoes, spinach, chorizo, almond, and crème fraiche; pork osso buco confit with roasted poblano pepper spaetzli, onion, corn and chorizo; green chili pork stew with cotija cheese, cilantro and corn tortilla; and pork chop with stone ground polenta cake, bacon-onion-tomato saute, and bourbon peach glaze.

Roy Choi

283.61
SOCIAL SCORE

While most of the chefs on this list built their reputations on their brick-and-mortar establishments, Roy Choi is a unique case in that you don’t need to make reservations to feast on his creations; if you’re lucky enough, they’ll come to you. His gourmet Korean taco truck Kogi took its first ride in 2008, first on Abbot Kinney Boulevard in Venice before taking Los Angeles (and the U.S.) by storm.

Named one of the top 10 “Best New Chefs” by Food and Wine magazine in 2010 (the first food truck operator to earn a place on that list), Roy has capitalized on his success by bringing his unique take on Mexican and Korean cuisine to the masses.

When he’s not rolling around in his Kogi truck, Roy has served as the technical advisor to Jon Favreau on the movie “Chef” and volunteers at South Central’s A Place Called Home, where he teaches underprivileged students how to cook. Roy has also published a part-memoir, part-cookbook called “L.A. Son: My Life, My City, My Food,” blending his memories as a child growing up in Los Angeles in the 1970s with the dishes that have allowed him to give back so much to his community.

Top Dishes

Also two Halloween special Foldies all October. #LocoL #Watts #Oakland

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Food's never been better. So proud of my crew.

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Look what I cooked for lunch today :) #LASon

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Specialties & Resources

The father of the food truck movement, Roy’s guiding principle has been to create “food that isn’t fancy,” but don’t let that motto fool you: his food is as much a delight as any of the more complex dishes created by the other chefs on this list.

Aside from Kogi, Roy also runs two Los Angeles-based restaurants: Chego!, which features Mexican-inspired rice bowls, and Sunny Spot, a Caribbean-inspired restaurant located in a former IHOP building that incorporates Hawaiian culture and tradition. Roy’s cooking style blends Mexican and Korean flavors and dishes, embracing two of Los Angeles’ biggest immigrant cultures and combining them into one well-rounded and delicious fusion. Evidence of this is best demonstrated by Kogi’s menu, which includes tofu tacos, spam sliders, kimchee quesadillas and short rib burritos.

At Chego!, Roy is able to expand his offerings beyond what you can eat standing up. Items include the piña krackalada (sweet coconut rice with caramelized pineapple and puffed rice), chicken adobo (wok-seared chicken with rice, vinegar, garlic soy sauce, grilled onions, chiles and pinoy-love), and the Pacman bowl (wok-seared chicken, double-caramelized short rib and spicy pork with rice, cheddar and jack cheeses, mayo, fresh herbs and chiles).

 

Mark Garcia

Mark Garcia
251.23
SOCIAL SCORE

Facebook: @ChefMarkGarcia

There are a lot of chefs who can be considered “rock stars” in their field, but only one has literally written the book on how to be a rock star chef: Mark Garcia. Not only is Mark an excellent chef in his own right (in fact, he graduated with honors from the Culinary Institute of America), but he is also one of the foremost authorities on branding and entrepreneurship in the culinary world.

Mark has traveled the country as a keynote speaker, and his talks focus largely on leadership, teamwork, social media use and branding innovation. Over the course of his 20-plus year career, Mark has worked at resort hotels, casual and fine dining establishments, food manufacturers, and grocery retailers, and his knowledge of the culinary industry extends end-to-end. Mark currently serves as the Director of Food Service for the Avocados from Mexico brand, and Avocados from Mexico recently secured a brand partnership deal with Reinhart’s Good Roots Produce.

When not cooking, Mark can be found delivering speeches on the importance of branding, entrepreneurial spirit and how chefs can set themselves apart from the competition in the fast-paced world of digital culinary marketing. 

Top Dishes

RepostBy @chefsroll: "Gorgeous work - by @avantgardevegan - #rollwithus #chefsroll #chefsloveavos - @avocadosfrommexico

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That's how our #avocado breakfast goes at #freshsummit2016 #FreshSummit #avocados #breakfast #healthyfood #healthybreakfast #fruit

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Avocado Breakfast is ready at #freshsummit2016 #FreshSummit

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Here's a tip for an epic cookout! 🇱🇷 #cookouts #cookout #grilled #grilledavocado #avocado #avocados #avocadolove

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Specialties & Resources

Because Mark’s focus is more on the business side of the culinary industry, he does not currently work in a particular kitchen. However, Mark has created dishes for multiple outlets such as Chef’s Roll, Avocados from Mexico, and others. Mark’s culinary style is designed to be visually appealing while adhering to traditional cooking styles, and he has trained in a variety of cuisines.

Mark’s specialties include carnita towers with avocado green marble; roast pork tenderloin with red, yellow and green tomatoes; a light whipped mousse parfait with peanuts, chocolate pretzels and caramel; apple turnover biscuits served with a fruit compote; traditional Mexican tamales wrapped in corn husks and served with egg, chorizo and salsa roja; cored pomegranate with dark chocolate and mint; roasted lamb shank with plantains and cinnamon; fried egg with rosemary and sage over red salsa and grilled bread; traditional chicken and waffles; pork osso bucco with a carrot glaze and mashed potatoes; and breaded flounder with sunflower seeds, peppers, tomatoes and broccoli.

Stephan Pyles

Stephan Pyles
261.72
SOCIAL SCORE

Facebook: @stephan.pyles

Instagram: @chefpyles

Few chefs can lay claim to being the founding father of an entire culinary style, but Stephan Pyles is no ordinary chef. Widely regarded as one of the founding fathers of Southwestern cuisine, Stephan utilizes a vast array of culinary influences to his advantage, and his reputation is a testament to how successful he has been thus far. Born and raised in Texas, Stephan began his culinary career apprenticing in the kitchen of his family’s truck stop before training in classic French cuisine. With two diverse styles under his belt, Stephan started his career with one goal in mind: to show the world that there is more to Texas cooking than Tex-Mex and barbecue.

Stephan’s early success in his solo restaurants was compounded by the success of his cookbooks (he has written five). Bon Appetit magazine names Stephan as the chef most responsible for changing the Texas cooking scene, and the New York Times called Stephan “an absolute genius in the kitchen.” Stephan has also won the AAA Five Diamond Award, the Restaurants and Institutions’ “Ivy Award,” the American Academy of Achievement award, and a James Beard Foundation award for “Best Chef: Southwest” (the first chef to receive that award). 

Top Dishes

Bone marrow, summer truffle in smokey bone #florastreetcafe

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Vegetarian Plate at Flora Street Cafe @spflorastcafe

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Lobster, burrata, basil seeds, heirloom cherries. #marea #italiano

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Vitello Tonnato with Pickled Persimmon in honor of Paolo Scavino. @stephanpylesrestaurant

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Specialties & Resources

Stephan uses a variety of culinary elements in his cooking to create new, exciting dishes. His influences include traditional Southern cooking, Southwestern food, Mexican and Tex-Mex cuisines, Cajun cuisine and Creole cooking. Stephan has been at the helm of a series of restaurants over his long and storied career, but his most recent endeavor is Flora Street Café in Dallas.

Dedicated to “elevated Texas cuisine,” offerings include smoked king salmon belly with spiced purple camote, pickled sweet corn and garlic chips; butternut squash-pomegranate salad with pumpkin panna cotta, hibiscus sorbet and heirloom apple; sea scallops with coconut gelée, pineapple textures, chipotle buckwheat groats and jasmine sea essence; kona kampachi with passion fruit aguachile, quinoa, marcona almonds and pineapple tomatillo; autumn golden squash soup with head-on spot prawn, piquillo pepper, black lime and saffron; Alaskan king crab with plum, avocado, hearts of palm, and yellow spoon bread; lobster tamale pie with wild paddlefish caviar and ancho glass; wood-grilled scallop with aji-smoked corn espuma, fingerling potatoes and padron peppers; wild coho salmon with mussel escabeche, corn & huitlacoche, okra and chanterelles; and striped Colorado lamb loin & saddle with caramelized banana, chewy beet and black rice.

Kevin Sbraga

Kevin Sbraga
261.88
SOCIAL SCORE

Facebook: @ksbraga

Instagram: @kevinsbraga

If you’re familiar with cooking competition shows like “Top Chef,” you’ve probably heard of Kevin Sbraga. Kevin won the competition in Season 7, catapulting him to stardom in the culinary world; however, Kevin’s victory was the result of a lifetime of hard work. Before appearing on “Top Chef,” Kevin worked in his father’s bakery as a teenager before studying at Johnson & Wales in Miami to round out his skills as a chef. After graduation, Kevin worked as a culinary director under another chef on this list, Jose Garces. After his time with Garces, Kevin served as executive chef under Stephen Starr, and Kevin credits these experiences as being crucial to his development as a culinary master.

Since his victory on “Top Chef,” Kevin has opened three restaurants: Sbraga, The Fat Ham and Sbraga & Company; both Sbraga and The Fat Ham are still thriving and have received overwhelmingly positive reviews. In 2008, Kevin also competed in the prestigious Bocuse d’Or competition, winning the award for “Best Meat Presentation.” In addition to his acclaim as a chef, Kevin has also won the StarChefs.com Rising Star Community award for his charitable works in his hometown of Philadelphia. 

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Specialties & Resources

At Sbraga (winner of the 2015 OpenTable “Diner’s Choice” award), the focus is a New American-inspired take on traditional Spanish tapas. Offerings include escargot with hazelnut and mirepoix; baby lettuces with greens, fennel and pistachio; capicola mousse with pepperoncini, salami and rustic bread; Hamachi crudo with sweet potato, tiger’s milk and citrus; saffron risotto with uni butter, mussels and crispy calamari; gnocchi with blueberries, chevre and parsley pistou; pork shoulder rigatoni with guindilla escabeche; baby squash with jollof rice, pickled onion and almond; lamb loin with plantains, onions and dibi; and octopus with potato, olive tapenade and piri piri.

At The Fat Ham (winner of Philadelphia magazine’s “Best of Philly 2016” award), Kevin again turns to his mastery of tapas, this time with a Southern flair. Menu items include hummus with boiled peanuts and grilled country bread; tasso ham with Dijon; grilled beets with fennel lemon dressing and pickled beets; grilled asparagus with gremolata, poached egg and pickled onion; shaved catfish with escabeche and crab boil aioli; shrimp & grits with country ham, scallion and peanuts; and country captain wings with curry and chow chow aioli.  

Sam Kass

Sam Kass
261.89
SOCIAL SCORE

Facebook: @SAM KASS

Instagram: @samkassdc

Sam Kass is not the first chef on this list to have worked with the Obama administration in some capacity, but his level of involvement far exceeds that of his contemporaries. From 2009 to 2014, Sam served as President Obama’s Senior Policy Advisor for Nutrition Policy, as Executive Director for First Lady Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move! Campaign, and as an Assistant Chef in the White House kitchen.

Though most chefs have gained fame and prestige working in a traditional kitchen environment, Sam took an alternate route, opting instead to open his own personal chef company, Inevitable Table, in 2007. Inevitable Table focused on healthy eating, and it was this effort that led him to become the personal chef to the Obama family when President Obama was merely a junior Senator from Illinois.

A vocal advocate for sustainable farming and organic, locally-sourced foods, Sam is well-known for his criticism of modern agricultural companies and genetically-modified foods. Since July of 2015, Sam has been employed by NBC News as their Senior Food Analyst; his responsibilities with NBC include reporting on healthful eating, food trends and food production policies across all of NBC’s platforms.

Top Dishes

Rare solo night at home. Turning leftover pork w beans and rice into a ginger fried rice.

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And braised short rib, sun chokes, house made pasta and a black truffles everywhere.

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Specialties & Resources

Sam’s devotion to sustainable farming and organic foods is similar to many chefs on this list, but few have Sam’s passion for using healthy, all-natural ingredients in their cooking. Sam has also recently joined the tech startup Innit, whose stated goal is to change the way people eat and “to help people manage and prepare their food with ease.” Innit’s technology supports that effort by using sensors to measure a food’s data (such as weight, temperature, and portion size) to calculate the ideal time and temperature an amateur cook will need to cook those foods. Innit’s goal is to integrate this technology into appliances like refrigerators, with the hope that they will make cooking easier and more accessible to a larger number of people.

Sam’s go-to dishes include spring kitchen garden chopped salad with broccoli, cauliflower florets, carrots, spring peas, kale, reggiano cheese, chicken breasts and champagne lemon vinaigrette; ginger fried rice with pork, beans, and fried egg; warm butter king crab with burnt meyer lemon roasted garlic aioli, cress salad, celery parsley, radishes and serrano; braised short rib with sun chokes, house made pasta and black truffles; and farfalle salad with tomatoes, basil, reggiano, olive oil and lemon.

Gerard Craft

Gerard Craft
262.03
SOCIAL SCORE

Facebook: @BrasseriebyNiche

Instagram: @gerardfcraft

Most chefs don’t make the leap to owning their own space until they’ve established themselves working in a series of kitchens, and it usually takes until their thirties to do so. Not so with Gerard Craft. Gerard opened his first restaurant Niche at the age of 25, and it was such a successful effort that he has since opened six other restaurants, all before most chefs would open their first space. More impressive, Gerard did this after a career switch.

Born and raised in Washington, D.C., Gerard originally worked as a snowboard photographer, and it was on assignment in Salt Lake City that he discovered his true calling as a chef. Jumping headfirst into the culinary world, Gerard first worked at Bistro Toujours in Park City, Utah, then at Chateau Marmont in Los Angeles. In addition to catapulting him towards his own space before his 25th birthday, Gerard’s work also earned him numerous accolades, including “Best New Chef” from Food & Wine magazine, Inc. magazine’s “Star Entrepreneurs Under 30” award, and a coveted James Beard Foundation award for “Best Chef: Midwest.” Gerard’s restaurants are now popular St. Louis staples, and if his fast start is any indication, we’re sure to see him pop up on lists like this one for a long time.

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Specialties & Resources

Gerard’s focus is representative of a larger culinary trend towards making even his most creative efforts appear simple and understated. Though his original space has since closed, Gerard has applied the same simplicity to his creations at his new locations. At Taste, menu offerings include cured olives with citrus and fennel; bacon fat-fried cornbread; fried okra with buttermilk aioli and hot sauce; garlic chili potatoes with lemon, parsley and parmesan; gnudi with oyster mushrooms, currants, arugula and brown butter; mussels with coconut milk, cilantro, chili and lime; barramundi with red beet, fennel, olive, pistachio and orange; and brick chicken with kale, croutons, capers and lemon.

At Brasserie, the focus lends itself more towards French cuisine. Items include frisee salad with bacon lardons, poached egg and bacon vinaigrette; spinach & endive salad with hard-boiled egg, celery, pickled red onion, croutons and mustard vinaigrette; pumpkin soup with salted grapes, pumpkin seed granola and oil; wild burgundy escargot with herbs, garlic and butter; beer-braised chicken legs with polenta, oyster mushrooms, bacon and sage; skate wing with parsley potatoes, beets, brown butter and sherry; and quail with bacon and truffle farce, fondant potatoes, braised leeks and cider jus.

Patrick Ryan

Patrick Ryan
262.11
SOCIAL SCORE

Hello, World!

Facebook: @portfondakc

Instagram: @portfonda

We’ve heard of chefs working out of food trucks before, but Patrick Ryan has one up on them: the first version of his solo restaurant, Port Fonda, was underground in an Airstream trailer. Naturally, Patrick started cooking at a young age, and he credits his mother and her parents with instilling in him a love of food and cooking. One of his first memories as a chef was making cinnamon apples with bacon in a cast-iron skillet and fresh-picked green beans with country ham, as Patrick recalls it being one of his grandfather’s favorite dishes.

After working around the United States in a variety of kitchens, Patrick returned home to Kansas City; as he puts it, he “saw Kansas City as a great opportunity to do something new and exciting for the area…I wanted to become part of the growing food and drink community.” After becoming frustrated with his early efforts, Patrick looked to his time at Rick Bayless’ Frontera Grill as being one of the most enjoyable experiences of his career, and he decided to make his own stamp in the world of Mexican cuisine. Patrick opened Port Fonda in 2010, and two years later, he had become successful enough to emerge from the underground with a brick-and-mortar version of Port Fonda. 

Top Dishes

 

Specialties & Resources

Patrick’s culinary style blends traditional Mexican street fare with a Midwestern, farm-to-table approach to the selection of ingredients and the way the dishes are put together. At Port Fonda, starter offerings include house guacamole with avocados, hot-ranch chicharrones, and raw vegetables; spicy pumpkin seed dip with raw, roasted & grilled vegetables; grilled sweet corn with epazote, poblano rojas, cotija, habanero mayonnaise, chile, cilantro and lime; chilaquiles with chorizo verde, molcajete salsa, chips, fried egg, crema, cilantro, onion and lime; shrimp and grits with tomato/chipotle/mezcal, cotija butter and fresh herb salad; pork belly and pork shoulder soup with bacon-chile de arbol broth, grilled vegetables, masa dumplings, crunchy garnishes, fried egg, cilantro and lime; marinated pork shoulder with spicy tomatillo-poblano broth, hominy, crunchy garnishes, fried egg, cilantro and lime; and fried oyster tacos with cabbage, radish, cilantro, onion and white salsa.

The main courses at Port Fonda include molten chorizo with red chorizo, Chihuahua cheese, poblano rajas and oregano; spinach/artichoke dip with mojo de ajo, Chihuahua, cream cheese, crema and red salsa; braised beef chuck roll with grilled jalapeno, creamed corn, chayote salad, chile de arbol vinaigrette and cornbread croutons; marinated and grilled swordfish skewers with coconut-tomato achiote and mofongo; and braised pork cheeks with rancho gordo beans, pickled red onions and habanero salsa.

Vivian Howard

262.30
SOCIAL SCORE

Facebook: @chefandthefarmer

Instagram: @chefandthef

Aside from perhaps Daniel Boulud, no chef has had as positive an impact on his mentees than Chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten, many of whom have appeared on this list; Vivian Howard is yet another example of his leadership. Born and raised in North Carolina, Vivian is the daughter of farmers, and their approach to cooking can be seen in her creations even today.

After graduating from the Institute of Culinary Education in 2003, Vivian worked at Wylie Dufresne’s wd-50 and trained with Vongerichten at his Spice Market restaurant. Vivian’s star had risen to the point that she was receiving offers from investors to open her own space in New York, but true to her roots, Vivian and Ben decided to take her parents up on their offer to buy a restaurant near her hometown, in Kinston, North Carolina. 

The result was Chef & the Farmer, opened in 2006. Since then, Vivian has been a James Beard Foundation semifinalist for “Best Chef: Southeast” 5 times (2011, 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015) and a James Beard Foundation award winner for “Outstanding Personality/Host” in 2016. Her restaurant has received a AAA “Four Diamond” award in 2010, 2011 and 2012, a Wine Spectator “Award of Excellence” in 2009, and a place on OpenTable’s “Top 100 Restaurants in America” list in 2011. Vivian opened her second space, Boiler Room, in 2013, across the street from Chef & the Farmer. 

Top Dishes

Proud of this one. #bananapudding

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Butterbean Burger @achefslife

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Specialties & Resources

Chef & the Farmer is located in a downtown building that once served as a mule stable, and continuing the farming thread seen throughout her work, more than 60% of the ingredients used in her creations come from within a 90-mile radius. At Chef & the Farmer, Vivian’s creations serve as modern takes on traditional regional dishes, and Vivian has made a point of soliciting recipe ideas from local community members.

Offerings at Chef & the Farmer include flash-fried collard greens with sea salt; yellowfin tuna tartare with crème fraiche, amara, spicy tomato and potato chips; fried okra with buttermilk ranch ice cream; grits with pimento cheese, squash salsa and pork rinds; beef carpaccio with butter bean conserve, crispy butter beans and shaved parmesan; sausage & grape skewers with mustard glaze, radishes & chervil; muscadines & kale with mustard vinaigrette, crispy country ham and smoked parmesan; apple squash and citrus with crispy farro, blue cheese and apple vinaigrette; flounder & fried oyster stew with potatoes, shaved fennel and turnips with shiitake mushrooms; pan-roasted chicken breast with butternut squash, kale, sorghum grain and glazed and preserved figs; and seared snapper with sweet potato tostones, citrus jalapeno aioli, and kale & apple herb salad.

Micah Frank

Micah Frank
262.59
SOCIAL SCORE

Most chefs can credit their success to one or two specific influences in the kitchen, but Micah Frank refuses to do so; as he puts it, “The great thing is that learning to cook is life-long, so I can’t say any one person taught me.” Born and raised in rural Indiana, Micah learned the importance of using the resources available to him as ingredients and of using leftovers to serve as part of a completely new and unexpected dish. Micah does credit another chef on this list, Fergus Henderson, as being an important influence in his cooking style. Micah learned from Fergus “the value of restraint in cooking, and of keeping things simple and not masking flavors with extra ingredients.”

Micah has received quite a few accolades during his career, including a nomination for the James Beard Foundation award for “Best Chef: Indianapolis” in 2015, a spot on Food & Wine magazine’s “People’s Best New Chef,” a profile in the Indianapolis Business Journal’s 2014 “Forty Under 40” list, and a slew of other television and print accolades. And although Micah might not want to give just one person credit for his success, it’s clear that the training he has received has made him one of the best chefs in the country, no matter where it came from.

Top Dishes

It's what's for dinner: #Maitake is Yourtake. #SeeWhatWeDidThere

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Whether it's a grilled cheese or ale steamed mussels...@AMELIA'S Focaccia finds her way on to the lunch menu. #grandmafood

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VIKING Lamb Tostadas

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Specialties & Resources

Micah has professed a love for basic ingredients like salt and vinegar, which are instrumental to nearly any dish but can also be used to bring out unexpected flavors in common ingredients. Micah’s solo endeavor is Indianapolis’ black market, known for its “well-provisioned farmhouse” vibe and constantly-evolving menu.

Offerings at black market include pickles & peanut butter, welsh rarebit with aged cheddar & ale and country toast; beef tongue cocktail with horseradish cream, pickled beets, fried potatoes & capers; roasted marrow bones with pickled blueberry-parsley salad and grilled bread; brussels sprouts with apple, sweet potato, creamy shallot dressing, pecans & aged gouda; marinated beets, goat cheese & walnuts with mixed greens, herbs, and focaccia; broccoli fritters with cauliflower cream and gremolata; rabbit & dumplings with house bacon and mustard veloute; beef & kraut pierogi with pickled turnips and horseradish cream; mushroom ragu and sweet potato grits with grilled rapini, goat cheese & herbs; slow-roasted red trout with tomato-fennel broth, fingerling potatoes & lemon aioli; smoked duck leg with house sage, greens and late summer cassoulet; grilled steak with bone-marrow bordelaise, fries & herb salad; and lamb neck pappardelle with chard, root vegetables, olives, mint & parmesan.

Mary Sue Milliken

Mary Sue Milliken
263.48
SOCIAL SCORE

Very few chefs have the longevity and sustained level of success as Mary Sue Milliken, so it should come as no surprise that she’s earned herself a place on this list. After graduating from the Washburne Culinary Institute in Chicago, Mary Sue worked in kitchens in Chicago and Paris with her eventual collaborator Susan Feniger. Combining their prodigious talents, Mary Sue and Susan opened City Café in Los Angeles in 1981, and in 1985 they opened Border Grill. Finally, in 1998, Mary Sue and Susan opened Ciudad in Los Angeles, and the success of the properties has led some to claim that Mary Sue and Susan are singlehandedly responsible for the evolution of the Los Angeles restaurant scene.

In addition to her continued success in the kitchen, Mary Sue is also an accomplished cookbook author and TV personality. Mary Sue has published five cookbooks outlining her expertise of Mexican cuisine, and her long-running Food Network shows “Too Hot Tamales” and “Tamales World Tour made her a household name. Mary Sue also appeared on TV with the legendary Julia Child on her show “Cooking with Master Chefs” in 1993, and most recently, Mary Sue appeared on “Top Chef Masters” in 2011, where she placed second in the competition.

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Specialties & Resources

Mary Sue’s bread and butter, as it were, is Mexican cuisine. And although that may lead you to believe she is just another of the long line of chefs to embrace this culinary style, the fact that she has had such continued success is a testament to her abilities.

At Border Grill, menu items include plantain empanadas with organic black beans, poblano, aged cotija, crema and red salsa; brisket taquitos with spicy slaw, guacamole, salsa fresca and crema; quinoa fritters with aged cotija cheese and aji Amarillo aioli; Peruvian ceviche with aji amarillo, ginger, lime, cucumber, avocado and crispy plantains; Yucatan pork slow-roasted in banana leaves and served with honey lime yams, roasted brussels sprouts and pineapple jicama salsa; wild mushroom quesadilla with huitlacoche, dried crushed peppers, roasted garlic and epazote; carnitas with roasted corn grits, serrano chile salsa, red onion, jalapeno bacon and cilantro; grilled turkey with cracked black pepper sauce, honey lime yams and seared greens; lamb barbacoa tacos with jalapeno mint salsa, queso fresco and avocado; creamy potato and chile tacos with Mexican cheese, guacamole, grilled corn relish and chipotle crema; short rib enchiladas with Mexican cheeses, roasted tomato guajillo sauce, lime-cured onions and crema; and pan-seared seasonal fish with organic white rice, tomato, Kalamata olive, jalapeno, oregano and a white wine garlic broth.

David Bouley

David Bouley
263.49
SOCIAL SCORE

Facebook: @Bouley.Restaurant

Instagram: @bouleynyc

In 1991, Zagat’s took a survey of 7,000 diners, asking them “Where would you eat the last meal of your life?” Not surprisingly given his place on this list, respondents “overwhelmingly” selected David Bouley’s eponymous restaurant, “Bouley.” Beginning with stops in the kitchens of Cape Cod, Santa Fe, France and Switzerland, David has established a reputation as being a versatile chef whose creativity knows no bounds.

David’s solo endeavor, opened in 1987, earned a four-star review from the New York Times and a James Beard Foundation award for “Best Restaurant”; for his part, David also earned a James Beard Foundation award for “Best Chef: New York City.” And though you might think the success of his restaurant was limited to the pre-millennium restaurant boom in New York City, in 2015, Bouley earned the title of “Best Restaurant in the United States” (and #15 in the world) from TripAdvisor’s Traveler’s Choice Awards.

David has also run two other properties: Danube (which received two Michelin stars) and Brushstroke, and his efforts to educate the public and the chef world on the finer points of cuisine have solidified his reputation as one of the greatest chefs ever to set foot in a kitchen.

Top Dishes

Deep water oyster with california sea urchin and oscetra caviar

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Specialties & Resources

David’s culinary background is largely focused on French cuisine, and his continued success is a clear indicator that he is willing to adapt his cooking style to keep pace with his competition. The menus at his properties show his versatility and mastery of the culinary arts.

At Bouley, offerings include porcini flan with golden princess and Alaskan Dungeness crab and black truffle dashi; rainbow trout with roasted pine nuts, wild currants and watercress; foie gras with sour, sweet and bitter cherries; Hawaiian hiramasa and Nantucket Bluefin with meyer lemon, fresh passion fruit and verbena olive oil dressing; blue kale and sheep’s milk gnocchi with a 24-month comte cloud; lamb with snow peas, sweet peas, fava beans, okra, and organic rosemary-perfumed quinoa; duck with einkorn grain and young sprouts and burgundy-braised foie gras; and kobe sirloin cut with edible biodynamic wasabi, garlic chips and ruby crescent potato puree.

At Brushstroke, David’s focus is on traditional Japanese cuisine, with items such as apple foam and lime sorbet with scallops, orange clam, uni and trout caviar; chawanmushi with botan ebi, aonori ankake and maitake puree; chilled kabocha and butternut squash soup, tender Portugal octopus with squid ink sauce & leek vinegar; and Sencha-green tea grilled duck breast with late summer mushrooms.

Jenn Louis

Jenn Louis
263.76
SOCIAL SCORE

Facebook: @chefjennlouis

Instagram: @jennlouis

Jenn Louis could be described as “your favorite chef’s favorite chef.” Though she may not have the public profile or as many television appearances under her belt as some of her compatriots on this list, Jenn has built a strong reputation for creating irreverent dishes that reflect her free-spirited approach to cooking and life.

A graduate of Pitzer College in Claremont, California, Jenn traveled throughout Europe and the Americas after matriculating, and her travels led her to Southern Israel where she worked in a dairy kibbutz. Upon returning to the United States, Jenn took a job as a cook at an Outward Bound base camp in North Carolina, and it was here that she uncovered her desire to make cooking her life’s work. Jenn enrolled in the Western Culinary Institute of Portland and, upon completing her formal education, began working as a line cook at Portland’s famous Wildwood restaurant.

Eventually, Jenn opened two restaurants of her own: Lincoln and Sunshine Tavern, and the success of both landed her profiles in the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Food & Wine magazine (where she was named one of their “Best New Chefs” in 2012), and Bon Appetit magazine. Jenn also parlayed her success into an appearance on Bravo’s “Top Chef Masters,” and she was a semifinalist for James Beard Foundation awards in 2010 and 2011 for “Best Chef: Northwest.”

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Specialties & Resources

At Sunshine Tavern, Jenn’s latest endeavor, the focus is on simple dishes created with unexpected ingredients, and the result is a culinary experience that sets itself apart from that of many other chefs on this list. Offerings include duck egg sandwich with pimento cheese and spicy pickle; jambon beurre royale with swiss, giardiniera and Dijon; Cuban sandwich with ham, swiss and spicy pickle; perciatelli with tomato and garlic toast; corn dog with cabbage slaw, giardiniera and brown mustard; and baked eggs with tomato and garlic toast.

At Lincoln, the menu is a bit more expansive, drawing on Jenn’s vast culinary talents. Menu items include octopus a la plancha with lentils and giardiniera, cornmeal onion rings with pimenton aioli; grilled dates and marcona almonds with lime and sea salt; baked hen eggs with cream, castelvetrano olives and breadcrumbs; lumache pasta with asparagus butter, preserved lemon and oregano; bucatini with herb pesto, lardo and almonds; spaccatelli with smoked tallow, speck and sherry; semolina cavatelli with chicken ragu, prosciutto and celery; Oregon albacore with green beans, peaches, marcona almonds and tarragon; roasted chicken with shoestring potatoes and little gem romaine; and zucchini, green beans and beets with tarbais beans and hazelnut.

Brooke Williamson

Brooke Williamson
263.98
SOCIAL SCORE

Facebook: @Williamson.Brooke

Instagram: @chefbrookew

When children decide on a career path, they’re typically not taken seriously; if they were, we would have more astronauts and firemen than we’d know what to do with. But not only has Brooke Williamson never wavered from her chosen childhood profession, she has also experienced massive success in pursuit of it. Brooke began her career as a teacher’s assistant at the Epicurean Institute of Los Angeles, then continued her education at the age of 18 working as a pastry assistant at Fenix at the Argyle Hotel.

Following a stint at Michael’s in Santa Monica, Brooke moved to the East Coast to work with another of our top-rated chefs, Daniel Boulud, at his eponymous restaurant in New York as an intern. Returning to L.A., Brooke was named executive chef at Boxer, then at Zax in Brentwood; it was during this time that she began to receive the critical acclaim she deserved, including nods from the Los Angeles Times and Forbes as a chef to watch. Brooke was also invited to cook at the James Beard house (the youngest female chef ever to receive such an invite), and she parlayed her success into multiple properties: Amuse Café and Beechwood in Venice, Hudson House, and The Tripel in Playa Del Rey.

Brooke was the runner-up on season 10 of “Top Chef,” and she was featured on MTV’s first food-related series “House of Food.” 

Top Dishes

🐙🐙🐙 @dakikokiko

A photo posted by Brooke Williamson (@chefbrookew) on

#lomilomi

A photo posted by Brooke Williamson (@chefbrookew) on

Yuzu kosho salmon on grain blend... 🍙🍙🍙 #musubidayeveryday @dakikokiko

A photo posted by Brooke Williamson (@chefbrookew) on

A few of the kid's favorite things for dinner... "Extra masago and fish cake please" #obviously

A photo posted by Brooke Williamson (@chefbrookew) on

 

Specialties & Resources

Brooke has embraced the California ethos of using locally-sourced and seasonal ingredients in her dishes, and her restaurants have seen a sustained run of critical and commercial acclaim as a result. At her most recent endeavor, The Tripel, Brooke has embraced a Modern American style of cooking.

Offerings at The Tripel include chicken sausage with seeded mustard; shaved prosciutto di parma; grilled shrimp chimichurri; sweet potato tots with horseradish honey mustard and spiced aioli; balsamic-marinated onion rings; lamb burger with honey-yogurt harissa sauce, cucumber salad and shaved red onion; turkey pastrami melt with cambozola blue-brie, house pickled and stout mustard; croquet madame with gruyere, black-forest ham and fried egg; the “Tripel Burger” (duck confit, pork & aged beef with truffle pecorino, arugula, and house apricot jam); squid-ink spaghetti with ground shrimp, lemon, chili oil and bottarga; black rice paella with duck, chicken, clams, snail, corn, peppers, serrano aioli and English peas; braised pork cheeks with roasted peewee potatoes, snap peas and “other spring things”; steamed mussels & clams in a serrano-pesto broth with cashews & grilled country bread; chicken waterzooi with heirloom carrots, leeks, kale, potato latke, fenugreek and gremolata; sweet carrot farro with sweet & sour eggplant, truffle pecorino, kale and leeks; and heirloom carrot salad with pea tendrils, crispy sunchokes, mozzarella pearls and green goddess dressing.

Andy Husbands

Andy Husbands
264.18
SOCIAL SCORE

Facebook: @SmokeShopBBQ

Instagram: @tremont647

Most chefs who appear on Gordon Ramsay’s “Hell’s Kitchen” tend to have their reputations diminished as a result; after all, very few chefs can withstand the constant deluge of shouting and insults and emerge unscathed from a night with Chef Ramsay. Andy Husbands is the rare exception.

The executive chef and owner of Tremont 657 and Sister Sorel in the South End of Boston and The Smoke Shop in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Andy has established a reputation as one of the best chefs in the country, a reputation that is sure to be solidified by his place on this list. Born and raised in Seattle, Andy moved to Massachusetts when he was 14 years old; that same year, his culinary career began when he took an after-school job working in a local bakery. After graduating from Johnson & Wales University, Andy took a job at the East Coast Grill as a sous chef before a cross-country motorcycle trip landed him in some San Francisco-based restaurant kitchens. Upon returning to Boston in 1996, Andy opened Tremont 647, and with its focus on seasonal and local ingredients, the California influence on the menu was clear.

Following on the success of Tremont 647, Andy opened Sister Sorel in 2000, and Andy has received critical recognition with semi-finalist finishes for James Beard Foundation awards in 2008 and 2009 and an “Award of Excellence” from Wine Spectator magazine.

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Specialties & Resources

Andy’s culinary influences grew from his time in a variety of kitchens, and the menu at Tremont 647 reflects it. Offerings include smoked chicken wings with agave, BBQ spices and coleslaw; pineapple chili-glazed pork belly with crispy pork rinds and sesame cucumber salad; roasted beet salad with crispy herbed goat cheese, pickled grapes and horseradish-beet puree; arugula walnut pesto fettuccine with roasted cauliflower, broccoli, acorn squash, parmesan and walnuts; apple cider-brined pork chops with mustard spaetzle, apple-beet slaw and warm bacon vinaigrette; and grilled strip steak with broccoli rabe, cherry peppers, caramelized shallots, fontina-stuffed tots and horseradish cream. At Sister Sorel, the menu items are largely the same, but also include a pan-seared bluefish with roasted fingerling potatoes, dill yogurt and pickled vegetable relish.

At The Smoke Shop, the focus is on traditional barbecue dishes with a high-end culinary twist, with items such as fried brussels sprouts with creole-spiced pork skins, preserved lemon & Old Bay aioli; brisket plates; slabs of barbecue ribs; glazed barbecue chicken thighs; spinach salad with butternut squash, bacon, toasted walnuts, parmesan crackers and bacon vinaigrette; romaine salad with creamy dill dressing, sunflower seeds and fried shallots; and pulled pork.

 

Richard Rosendale

Richard Rosendale
264.27
SOCIAL SCORE

One of the few Certified Master Chefs on this list, Richard Rosendale has taken the ultra-traditional route to success, and his efforts have paid off handsomely. Born in Pennsylvania, Richard knew early on that the culinary arts were his calling, and he has worked toward that goal ever since. Going the “classical training” route has led Richard to a variety of well-respected kitchens in Northern Italy, Germany, Luxembourg, Switzerland, Norway, France, and multiple five-star restaurants across the United States, including sous vide training at the French Laundry.

Many chefs eschew the traditional route and open their own restaurants too early, preferring a trial-and-error approach to running a kitchen. Conversely, Richard spent six years as an apprentice under several Certified Master Chefs, and his success led him to become the U.S. candidate to perform at the international Bocuse d’Or competition in France in 2013. Richard was also the youngest member in the U.S. ACF Culinary Team’s history, and was one of just five chefs to represent the United States in the 2004 World Culinary Olympics in Erfurt (not surprisingly, the U.S. team won). Richard has also appeared on multiple Food Network specials, and his restaurant Rosendale’s in Ohio was a roaring success. Richard also served as the executive chef at The Greenbrier in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia until his Bocuse d’Or appearance in 2013. Rich’s new restaurant, Roots 657, has received plenty of critical acclaim since its opening this year.

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Specialties & Resources

To say Richard has just one culinary specialty would be wildly inaccurate; after all, his Master Chef certification consisted of a 130-hour examination in which all culinary styles were covered. His multifaceted expertise in the culinary arts shines through in the menu at Roots 657, a bistro-style restaurant that blends high-end culinary concepts and a simple, understated approach to cooking.

At Roots 657, located in Virginia wine country, offerings include a fried chicken sandwich with buttermilk-fried chicken breast with sriracha ranch; slow-roasted pulled pork shoulder with creamy coleslaw and tangy barbecue sauce served on a cheddar jalapeno roll; chickpea burger with roasted broccoli and cauliflower, served with ranch tzatziki on a potato bun; new potato salad with snap peas, green beans, fresh peas, asparagus and farm egg; curried Israeli couscous with dried cranberries and roasted pecans; smoked turkey sandwich with fire-roasted peppers, Swiss, and spinach and arugula; Italian sub with capicola, salami, smoked ham, provolone, lettuce, tomato, onion and pepperoncini on a soft hoagie roll; and a Mediterranean wrap with char-grilled seasonal vegetables, chickpea & tapenade spread and feta cheese wrapped in a flour tortilla. Though the fare may seem simple, the touch of a master chef sets Roots 657 apart from its competition.


Aaron Silverman

Aaron Silverman
264.31
SOCIAL SCORE

Facebook: @rosesluxury

Instagram: @rosesluxury

Aaron Silverman is the rare chef on this list who not only didn’t grow up in a family of foodies, but also didn’t have any early interest in the culinary world. Though he has fond memories of his parents’ cooking, Aaron never considered cooking as a professional pursuit. That began to change in high school when Aaron worked at Gepetto restaurant, and after graduating college and realizing that money wasn’t a driving force in his life, Aaron began to consider the culinary arts.

Aaron trained himself by watching cooking shows and experimenting with recipes and was immediately hooked by the gratification one receives when they create a delicious, well-rounded dish. He began working in the kitchen of 2941 in Falls Church, Virginia, where he learned from chef Jonathan Krinn the realities of the restaurant industry. And almost 10 years later, Aaron opened Rose’s Luxury in Washington, D.C.

Rose’s Luxury is well-known as one of the first restaurants to offer health insurance and full benefits to all its employees, but Aaron’s charitable nature doesn’t end there; servers also have the freedom to give away one free dish to every table they serve. For Aaron, cooking is about joy, and that ethos permeates every aspect of his business pursuits.

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Specialties & Resources

Aaron’s unconventional introduction to the culinary world is reflected in the offerings at Rose’s Luxury. Dishes include foie gras & chicken liver pate with plum mostarda & brioche; pork sausage with habanero, peanuts & lychee salad; romaine hearts with duck egg, crispy potato, herbs & buttermilk; grilled beef sirloin with hollandaise & green papaya; blue catfish with crispy bread, green tomato relish & saffron aioli; boudin-stuffed squid with cold potato salad & herb; hand-cut trenette; arro reginetti with garlic, kale & mustard greens; rigatoni with tomato, eggplant, anchovy & int; greek chicken with housemade pita & pickled vegetables; and smoked brisket with white bread, horseradish & slaw.

Building on the success of Rose’s Luxury, Aaron also opened Pineapple & Pearls this past April. Centered on an idea of whimsical elegance, the menu changes daily with new tasting items for guests. Past offerings include smoked beef rib with mole and nixtamalized grits; and white-asparagus okonomiyaki coated with mushroom duxelles and chicken mousse rolled in a rice-flour crepe and topped with bonito flakes. Aaron has stated his desire to make Pineapple & Pearls a “place of celebration,” and the lighthearted approach to their cuisine allows guests to focus on the dining experience as a whole. Based on its success, Aaron’s creations are sure to continue to be in high demand.

Jon Shook

Jon Shook
264.45
SOCIAL SCORE

Jon Shook is often credited with changing the culinary scene in Los Angeles, so his place on this list should come as no surprise. Jon met his partner Vinny Dotolo while attending culinary school at The Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale. After graduation, the two continued their professional journey together, first at The Strand in South Beach, then at Mark’s, The River House, and Wildflower Restaurant in Vail, CO. After a short stint as Harrison Ford’s personal chefs, Jon and Vinny launched the catering company Caramelized Productions in 2004.

In 2008, Jon and Vinny decided to open a place where, for once, they could choose the menu. Animal, their “meat-centric, farmer’s market-driven restaurant,” opened in 2008, and in 2009, Jon and Vinny received Food & Wine magazine’s “Best New Chefs Award”; in addition, Animal was nominated for a “Best New Restaurant” award by the James Beard Foundation.

In addition to his work with Vinny, Jon is also the co-owner of Trois Mec, Petit Trois and Trois Familia with another chef on this list, Ludo Lefebvre. If a chef’s talent can be measured by the company he keeps, Jon has it in spades.

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Specialties & Resources

As a caterer, Jon demonstrated a unique ability to cook anything his guests could want, making him one of the more versatile chefs on this list. At Animal, the focus is more on the “whole-animal” ethic embraced by another chef on our list, Chris Cosentino. Jon has utilized his experiences in other kitchens to create a menu that is at once conceptually daring and traditional. At Animal, offerings include spicy beef tendon chip with charred onion pho dip; veal brains with vadouvan, apricot puree and carrot; rabbit larb with minutina, herbs, thai chili and crispy shallot; Mongolian sweetbreads with shiitake mushrooms, scallion and kochukaru; and bone-in ribeye with bone marrow butter and potato aligot.

No chef survives long without displaying a willingness to adapt their cooking style to incorporate other styles, and Jon’s dedication to honing his craft and expanding his range has served him well in his pursuits. At Trois Familia, offerings include churro French toast with salt & straw vanilla ice cream and Mexican chocolate; beet tartare tostada with cornichon, lime and avocado crema; and the Galette crepe with egg, chorizo and jack cheese.

Dan Kluger

Dan Kluger
264.45
SOCIAL SCORE

Facebook: @chefdankluger

Instagram: @dan_kluger

In New York City, there are few yet-to-be-opened restaurants that have inspired such breathless anticipation as Dan Kluger’s forthcoming solo effort, Loring Place. This, of course, is a testament to Dan’s considerable talent in the kitchen and his vast array of culinary skills, and his inclusion on this list is further proof that Dan is indeed a chef to watch.

During his externship as part of Syracuse University’s Nutrition and Hospitality Management program, Dan worked in the dining room of Danny Meyer’s Union Square Café. After graduating, Dan returned to Union Square Café, this time as a prep cook. From there, Dan worked his way up at various restaurants like Tabla, The Core Club, and Jean-Georges before serving as the executive chef at ABC Kitchen. During his tenure, ABC won the 2011 James Beard Foundation award for “Best New Restaurant,” and Dan himself was named the “Best New Chef of 2012” by Food & Wine magazine. Dan also served as the executive chef for ABC Cocina, and in 2014, he was nominated for a James Beard Foundation award for “Best Chef: New York City.” With that kind of resume, his new venture is bound to be a rousing success.

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Specialties & Resources

The variety of kitchens in which Dan has trained has given him a unique approach to cooking and the culinary arts. Dan credits his time at Tabla as being instrumental to understanding the balance of flavors and textures in his dishes as well as opening up completely new avenues for his cooking with the use of Indian spices. Additionally, Dan’s pure farm-to-table methodology ensures that his guests only receive the best and freshest locally-sourced ingredients.

At ABC Kitchen, menu offerings include roasted Portobello and celery leaves; house-made chicken and pork sausage with pistachio, potatoes and whole grain mustard; house-made ricotta with strawberry compote and grilled bread; tomato and raspberry gazpacho; shaved raw fluke with radish and nasturtium vinaigrette; line-caught tuna sashimi marinated with ginger and mint; roast carrot and avocado salad with crunch seeds, sour cream and citrus; pretzel-dusted calamari with spicy tomato and mustard aioli; ricotta ravioli with herbs and tomato sauce; fresh fettuccine with pistachio pesto, wax beans and cherry tomatoes; salmon with habanero-lime sauce, sweet corn, scallions and market cucumbers; hake with slow-roasted tomatoes and cucumber yogurt; crispy pork confit with smoked bacon marmalade and braised turnips; and wood oven roasted Maine lobster with oregano and lemon-chili vinaigrette.

Elizabeth Falkner

Elizabeth Falkner
264.77
SOCIAL SCORE

For Elizabeth Falkner, the amount of time she has spent in the public eye has led to all the recognition a chef could ever want. Elizabeth is most frequently seen on cooking shows, having appeared on “The Next Iron Chef: Super Chefs,” “The Next Iron Chef: Redemption,” Chopped All-Stars,” “Top Chef,” “Top Chef Masters,” “Top Chef: Just Desserts,” “Top Chef: Canada,” and “Food Network Challenge.” Elizabeth also served as the executive chef, pastry chef and managing partner of Citizen Cake as well as the co-owner and executive chef of Orson (both located in San Francisco).

In 2012, Elizabeth won First Prize at the World Pizza Championships in Naples, Italy, her accomplishments, the latest in a long line of accomplishments. Elizabeth has been named a “Rising Star Chef” by the San Francisco Chronicle (1995), “Pastry Chef of the Year” by San Francisco magazine (1999), and one of the “10 Women with Substance and Style” by Organic Style magazine (2004). Elizabeth has also won two “Golden Bowl” awards from the Women Chefs and Restaurateurs organization, one for “Best Pastry Chef” and one for “Women Who Inspire” (both in 2003). Last but not least, Elizabeth was also nominated for a James Beard Foundation “Best Pastry Chef” award in 2005, the recipient of the “Charles M. Holmes Award” by the Human Rights Campaign in 2005, and an inductee into the Culinary Hall of Fame.

Top Dishes

#BLT #lunch Chez @cheffalkner

A photo posted by Elizabeth Falkner (@cheffalkner) on

Mmmmm Make Indian food!

A photo posted by Elizabeth Falkner (@cheffalkner) on

 

Specialties & Resources

While many chefs have one or two styles to which they adhere, Elizabeth’s cooking style is so diverse it almost defies description. Elizabeth has long been considered one of the foremost American chefs in a variety of culinary styles, including Pioneering American fare, traditional (and non-traditional) Italian cuisine, Mediterranean dishes, bread-making, pizzas, pastries, cakes and the California style of using locally-sourced ingredients in dishes.

Though the name Citizen Cake may make it sound like a pastry shop, the offerings included heirloom tomatoes with grilled pork belly panzanella, basil and aioli; arugula salad with melon, nicoise olives and feta; spinach salad lardon with poached egg and mustard vinaigrette; and Dutch-souffle with summer fruit compote. Of course, the pastries also played a large role, with items such as cassis-violet, basil and hazelnut-chocolate macaroons; tangerine creamsicle verrine; and “A ChocWork Orange” petite gateau.

At Orson, offerings included baked goat cheese salad with frisee, apples and walnut vinaigrette; thai coconut curry mussels with fresno chili, cilantro and grilled bread; braised beef short ribs with semolina-ricotta cake, roasted beets, horseradish cream and cress; chicken ballotine with gnocchi, pancetta and parsnip; and local rock cod with daikon, dashi broth, ginger and tapioca.