The Elevated Tavern: Michael Schwartz's Concept in Miami Offers an Inviting Atmosphere with an Approachable, yet Refined Menu

The Elevated Tavern: Michael Schwartz's Concept in Miami Offers an Inviting Atmosphere with an Approachable, yet Refined Menu

By Kerri Adams, Editor-at-Large

Dining and drinking have been a part of America's social fabric since colonial times, and the setting of this activity was often Taverns. 

These establishments were and always have been where all different walks of life to socialize over a drink and some bites. 

But, taverns have come a long way from what they used to be.

"From colonial times to the mid-19th century you had taverns, which provided food and lodging. They had a tapster in a cage—as opposed to at a long bar—and it was open to all members of the community, including women and children. Then you start to see the dedicated saloon, which didn’t necessarily serve food, and mixed cordials and spirits at a long bar. Women were rarely allowed. Hotel bars existed on the high end, catering to business travelers. During Prohibition there were speakeasies, and after that people went back to the term tavern, though it was more like the old saloon," said Christine Sismondo, author of "America Walks into a Bar," to "Smithsonian."

The concept of a tavern is still very much alive today. But now, taverns range from being small, dimly lit, dingy bars to high-end restaurants that offer an impressive bar menu

One of the most popular restaurants in Miami (that is a Foodable top 25 veteran) is Cypress Tavern, a restaurant that channels the esthetics of a refined tavern, while serving top notch food and an array of hand-crafted cocktails.

 

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